Which Way the Wind Blows is a Transmission Matter

Regional transmission organization PJM Interconnection is looking to the future of wind. Specifically, when and where the wind might blow strong enough so power production from wind turbines can be scheduled for transmission to the grid.

PJM conducted an industry workshop among various wind power industry and grid-operator officials to discuss wind-forecasting techniques that could help integrate new wind power capacity. The Workshop on Wind Resources Forecasting and RTO/ISO Integration was an opportunity for participants to learn about available technology that forecasts the amount of wind, to share their experiences in scheduling wind resources and to exchange ideas. While other generation sources can be counted on to run at specific times, wind-powered generation is available only when the wind blows, and getting wind power to the grid has been difficult to schedule, according to PJM. Using a forecasting approach could allow wind generators to participate in day-ahead markets at a lower risk. It also could enhance grid operations by providing system operations with information on how much electricity to expect from wind resources during an operating hour. “Regional markets, such as PJM, offer wind power and other alternative technologies a ready and vast market with many participants,” said Phillip G. Harris, PJM president and chief executive officer. “It’s an advantage a developer would not have if it were limited to selling only to one local utility. While technology advances and government policy are increasing the momentum behind wind power development, large wholesale electricity markets provide the necessary element for wind power’s economic success.” PJM has 260 MW of wind power in operation and 3,925 MW of wind projects in the interconnection study process. Experts at the meeting included representatives from the American Wind Energy Association, Utility Wind Interest Group, the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory, California Independent System Operator, ISO New England, Independent Electricity System Operator of Ontario and the New York Independent System Operator.

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Renewable Energy World's content team members help deliver the most comprehensive news coverage of the renewable energy industries. Based in the U.S., the UK, and South Africa, the team is comprised of editors from Clarion Energy's myriad of publications that cover the global energy industry.

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