New England’s Oldest Wind Farm Growing

Voters in Princeton have paved the way for New England’s oldest operational wind farm to also become the biggest in the state as it is upgraded with new turbines.

Princeton, Massachusetts – February 13, 2003 [SolarAccess.com] The Princeton Town Clerk Office certified that Ballot Question No. 2 concerning the Wind Farm Upgrade Project passed by a vote of 605 yes votes to 210 no votes. Voter approval will now enable Princeton Municipal Light Department and its development partner Community Energy, Inc. to replace the eight 40 kW wind turbines currently sited on 100-foot towers at the Mount Wachusett wind farm with two new 1.5 megawatt (MW) wind turbines to be sited on 230-foot towers. “Princeton voters carefully weighed the many benefits of clean and Renewable Energy against the visual landscape changes necessary to install fewer but taller wind generators and in the end choose wind energy,” said Eric Blank, Co-founder and Vice President of Community Energy, Inc. the project developer. “Hopefully Princeton’s foresight will serve as a positive example for other New England communities searching for clean, locally available and renewable alternatives to imported and polluting conventional hydrocarbon energy sources.” Construction is scheduled to begin in August with the project being operational by November of 2003. The new generating facility is expected to supply more that 40 percent of the town’s annual electrical needs. Founded in 1999, Community Energy, Inc. is involved, independently or through partnerships, in more than 100 megawatts of new wind energy developments in the Mid-Atlantic, Midwest and Western regions of the United States. The company has pioneered the sale of New Wind Energy credits to local businesses, universities, municipalities, aggregation groups and has also successfully cultivated retail demand for wind energy in these regions.
Previous articleSolar Energy Industries Association: Exit Fees a Tax on Sunlight
Next articleBiofuels Agreement

No posts to display