Negotiation for Vertical Wind Turbine Rights

First National Power Corporation (formerly Capstone International Corporation) has reached an agreement to acquire exclusive trademarked technology, development and marketing rights for the Vertical Wind Turbine, WindCrank, from Vertical Wind Turbine Technologies, a privately held Hawaiian Company with Research and Development facilities in Paris, Texas. Preliminary negotiations were concluded this week and First National will complete a Letter of Intent (LOI) with-in the next two weeks and expects a definitive agreement by April 10th. First National has also an option to acquire the Patents and assets of Vertical Wind Turbine.

Fox Island, Washington – February 24, 2004 [SolarAccess.com] First National Power Corporation (formerly Capstone International Corporation) has reached an agreement to acquire exclusive trademarked technology, development and marketing rights for the Vertical Wind Turbine, WindCrank, from Vertical Wind Turbine Technologies, a privately held Hawaiian Company with Research and Development facilities in Paris, Texas. Preliminary negotiations were concluded this week and First National will complete a Letter of Intent (LOI) with-in the next two weeks and expects a definitive agreement by April 10th. First National has also an option to acquire the Patents and assets of Vertical Wind Turbine. The Vertical Wind Turbine patented design won an advanced technology award in Atlanta, Georgia, where one of the people on the nominating board was Dr. Gordon Gould, inventor of the laser. The design was given a favorable review by the Department of Energy (DOE) through its National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) 19 program. The WindCrank is designed to capture controlling energy from any moving force such as wind, water, geothermal, etc. It can be used in a vertical or horizontal application, depending on the end use. These proven methods include, but are not limited to: centrifugal force: deflectors; louvers; blade timing, sail effect; and flywheel effect. The WindCrank “blades” are set in a specific sequence to capture impulse wind energy. Fixed deflectors are placed on the tip of each blade to boost power and accompany balance weights for a flywheel effect. An auxiliary (moveable) deflector is positioned so as to direct the wind forces to the inside of the blades and divert wind from the backside of the rotating blades. Louvers are incorporated to provide a sail effect for increased turbine efficiency. The auxiliary deflector is also used as a brake to stop rotation of the turbine by directing equal wind forces to both concave and convex sides of the blades. Thus, there is no need for a mechanical braking system and the deflector can also be used to control the RPM’s of the turbine. Vertical Wind Turbine Technologies received its Qualified High Technology Business (QHTB) designation for Hawaii, under House Bill, HB175, Hi Tech Tax Law, Act 221, and, as such, tax incentive funding is available. According to the company, the co advantages of this patented design are the exceptional torque, stackable applications, controlled RPM’s coupled with a long service life, low noise and slow speed avoiding the threat of bird fatalities caused by prop powered units. The WindCrank services two power take-offs and requires no braking.
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