German Climate Talks Must be ‘Win-Win’ Meeting

World governments must concentrate of investing in renewable energy in both developed and developing nations when they meet next week in Germany to discuss climate change, says the head of the United Nations Environment Programme.

PARIS, France, FR, 2001-07-24 [SolarAccess.com] World governments must concentrate of investing in renewable energy in both developed and developing nations when they meet next week in Germany to discuss climate change, says the head of the United Nations Environment Programme. “The development process, urgently needed to fight poverty, must become less carbon intensive”, says Klaus Toepfer. “We must do everything we can do integrate clean technologies that have a higher energy efficiency, and also look for new sources of energy production.” The widespread introduction of wind, solar and other renewables is important to meet the sustainable energy needs of developing countries, and he refers to reports on renewable energy produced by the World Energy Council and the G8 governments. “The WEC studies indicate that the number of new clean energy schemes, government initiatives and renewable energy projects will, by 2005, save the equivalent of one billion tonnes of C02 emissions annually,” he notes. “This equates to a saving of over 3 percent in terms of global greenhouse gas emissions emitted in the year 2000.” “Modern wind turbines, solar panels and geo-thermal are now state-of-the-art technologies, with more innovations in the pipeline,” he adds. “Their ability to provide reliable, competitive and clean energy cannot be understated.” “The scientific evidence clearly shows that climate change is the most serious socio-economic and environmental problem facing humanity in the 21st century,” he notes. “In Bonn next week, while pushing ahead to ensure immediate short-term action, governments must also build the basis for a long-term structured and coordinated response to the problem.” In addition to promoting renewable energy, Toepfer the Kyoto Protocol process must be kept alive by having governments reach common agreement on the rules for obtaining emissions credits through emissions trading and carbon sinks, and by sending “a clear signal to civil society, and especially the business community, that despite some differences between Governments there is a common commitment for action.” “On the basis of thorough scientific research, all countries agree that we now have firm proof that climate change is happening,” he says. “More scientific study is useful, but this should not be used as an excuse for inaction.” Economic development can be achieved without increasing emissions of carbon dioxide, and the pessimism preceding the climate talks is masking “small but real progress” towards reducing emissions. China accounts for 14 percent of world C02 emissions and, despite economic growth, has reduced emissions by more than 10 percent since 1996 by breaking the link between growth and a parallel rise in emissions. “We must do more, we have to do more and we can do more,” says Toepfer. “Climate change is not simply an environmental problem but a huge threat to the overarching goals of poverty reduction and the attainment of sustainable development worldwide.”
Previous articleFormer Wind Energy Officials Form New Consulting Company
Next articleCanada Opposes Renewable Energy, says Environmental Group

No posts to display