Georgia Power to Acquire 250 MW of Wind; Underscores Strategy of Portfolio Diversity

Another Southern Company utility now has wind energy in its portfolio.

Georgia Power last week announced it has entered into an agreement with EDP Renewables North America that for the first time will bring wind energy to the utility’s energy portfolio.

Through the contracts, Georgia Power will source 250 MW of cost-effective wind energy from EDP’s wind farms in southwest Oklahoma. The wind energy purchased through the contracts will provide enough electricity to power more than 50,000 Georgia homes, the investor-owned utility said. Georgia Power will begin receiving the wind power on January 1, 2016.

“We are continuously assessing energy options, such as wind, to include in our generation mix in order to provide our customers with clean, safe, reliable, sustainable and low-cost energy,” President and CEO Paul Bowers told AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly. “We are committed to maintaining a diverse fuel portfolio and energy options that provide the best overall economic value to our customers.”

The utility certainly achieved economic value with the recent wind power contract. 

The agreement is expected to deliver cost savings to Georgia Power customers over the life of the contract, the company said. The contract, in fact, continues a trend of utilities in the South purchasing wind energy (and often highlighting wind’s cost savings). Among the utilities in the South now purchasing wind are Alabama Power and the Tennessee Valley Authority.  Both Alabama Power and Georgia Power are subsidiaries of the Southern Company, an investor-owned utility company that proudly states it has “rates below the national average.”

This article was originally published in AWEA’s Wind Energy Weekly and was republished with permission.

Lead image: Wind turbines via Shutterstock

Author

  • Carl is Editor & Publications Manager at the American Wind Energy Association, where has worked since 2006. At AWEA he oversees AWEA's online and print publications including the Wind Energy Weekly, Windpower Update, and other products. He has worked as a journalist in the energy industry as a staff writer for Public Utilities Fortnightly magazine and in the association sector as senior editor at Association Management magazine. He also has covered the home-building industry, where his areas of greatest interest were sustainable development and "smart growth," and has written articles for numerous other publications as a freelance writer. Carl received his B.A. from James Madison University and spent some time in New Orleans teaching as well as working with homeless youth.

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Carl is Editor & Publications Manager at the American Wind Energy Association, where has worked since 2006. At AWEA he oversees AWEA's online and print publications including the Wind Energy Weekly, Windpower Update, and other products. He has worked as a journalist in the energy industry as a staff writer for Public Utilities Fortnightly magazine and in the association sector as senior editor at Association Management magazine. He also has covered the home-building industry, where his areas of greatest interest were sustainable development and "smart growth," and has written articles for numerous other publications as a freelance writer. Carl received his B.A. from James Madison University and spent some time in New Orleans teaching as well as working with homeless youth.

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