World’s Scientists to Look for Renewable Energy of the Future

An international scientific collaboration has been launched to discover breakthroughs in energy and other technologies.

PALO ALTO, California, US, 2001-09-02 [SolarAccess.com] An international scientific collaboration has been launched to discover breakthroughs in energy and other technologies. Motion Sciences Organization is an advanced physics research organization that supports an international network of individuals, institutions and companies that pioneer breakthrough technologies. The new collaboration will conduct fundamental theoretical and experimental research to discover physical principles that enable breakthroughs in energy generation and propulsion technologies. “The organization of Motion Sciences represents a milestone,” says Bernard Haisch of the California Institute for Physics & Astrophysics. He claims it will enable “a new level of focus and collaboration among the many scientists and institutions exploring key unanswered questions in physics.” Participating scientists come from NASA, Lockheed-Martin, MIT, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, Enrico Fermi Institute at the University of Chicago, the University of Maryland and Princeton University. They now are actively conducting research in advanced electrodynamics, quantum theory and materials sciences. The alliance is expected to accelerate the emergence of products for urgent near-term and long-term needs in renewable energy, advanced propulsion, electromagnetic and acoustic sensing, infrastructure construction and protection, navigation instrumentation, and testing and analysis systems. “After much preparatory work, we have reached a critical mass and are ready to move to the next stage,” adds MSO chairman Firmage. “We’ve formed a new structure to enable tighter collaboration, better prioritization, larger-scale programs, and a common vehicle for open public engagement and financial sponsorship.”
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