Renewable Electricity is Crucial for Developing Nations

Governments in development nations may fall if they cannot provide reliable power and safe water, says the chairman of a U.S. company that is involved in solar water pumping.

PENNINGTON, New Jersey, US, 2001-06-20 [SolarAccess.com] Governments in development nations may fall if they cannot provide reliable power and safe water, says the chairman of a U.S. company that is involved in solar water pumping. “More than one billion people in the developing world have no ready access to safe water and the need for reliable sources has become so urgent that governments may rise and fall based on solutions to the problem,” says Quentin Kelly of WorldWater Corp. “Sources for clean water are at a premium, particularly in the poorer nations which do not have the financial resources and technical means to generate new supplies. Growing populations, famine and drought are exacerbating the problem in many of these countries, leading to instability and political unrest.” The United Nations estimates that $8 billion is spent annually by governments and international agencies to provide safe drinking water in developing countries, and that $100 billion will be required over the next five years, he told the New York Society of Security Analysts fifth annual alternative energy conference. He says his company is meeting the challenge by developing solar pumps and solar electrical systems that provide clean water and electricity in developing countries around the world. “We have low-cost solar pumps operating in 17 countries around the globe,” he says. “They are a viable solution to providing clean water and electrical power to countries plagued by a lack of financial resources to meet the needs of their people.” “WorldWater’s low-cost, low-maintenance solar pumps can deliver more than 2,000 gallons per minute from rivers for irrigation or drinking water from a depth down to 1,000 feet, four times the operating capability of competing systems, and deliver 5 to 260 gallons per minute for household, village, or livestock drinking water,” he explains. “Our community and residential solar power systems are simple, clean, and reliable, providing cost-effective electricity systems that include pre-wired control panels, solar batteries, fluorescent lights and DC outlet and plug for appliances.” WorldWater has solar pumping and solar electrical systems operating in the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Pakistan, Ethiopia, Tanzania and Ecuador, and is negotiating projects in other developing nations. It was recently named by the government of Somalia to be that country’s master consultant and contractor for all water and energy programs. In addition to providing critical services to sustain life, solar water and electrical systems help to create economic and political stability in many beleaguered nations, he says. The NYSSA alternative energy conference examined the commercialization of distributed power technology, solar energy, fuel cells, photovoltaics and wind power. The members of the Society are portfolio managers, security analysts, investment advisors, and others involved in the investment process.
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