Renewable Biodiesel Fuel Gets Air Quality Licence

The Southern States Power has demonstrated that biodiesel can produce power in an efficient and cost-effective manner from an environmentally-friendly product.

ONTARIO, California, U.S. 2001-08-21 [SolarAccess.com] The Southern States Power has demonstrated that biodiesel can produce power in an efficient and cost-effective manner from an environmentally-friendly product. SSPC demonstrated its standby back-up power generation project for the University of California, Riverside using 100 percent biofuel, all permitted by the largest air quality regulatory body in the United States. “It is critical that the company continue to educate alternative fuel clients about the advantages of biodiesel over other fuels, particularly non-renewable petroleum products,” says SSPC vice president William Sheaffer. Officials from UCR and the City of Riverside Public Utilities saw the demonstration of the potential for biodiesel, not only for standby back up stationary power generation, but for other applications such as heavy duty equipment and trucks currently using petroleum-based diesel. South Coast Air Quality Management District, the largest air quality regulatory body in the United States, permitted three of the 2 MW biofueled generators to provide standby backup electrical power to UCR and to feed electricity to the local power grid. This is the first time that SCAQMD has issued a permit authorizing stationary power generation running exclusively on 100 percent biodiesel. The recent deployment of diesel engines throughout California in response to power shortages has caused concern from air quality officials. Biodiesel, with a lower emissions profile, can reduce the amounts of carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and particulate matter released into the air by diesel generators. The U.S. consumes 27 billion gallons of diesel each year, and the Department of Energy wants 30 percent of petroleum-based motor fuel replaced by alternative fuels by 2010. SSPC hopes to capture a significant portion of this expanding market for biodiesel through an alliance with soybean farmers in the midwest.
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