Energy Group Releases Poll On Congressional Action

A U.S. group says a new poll shows that Americans overwhelmingly want action now to increase energy supplies, as well as more efforts in conservation and research.

WASHINGTON, DC, US, 2001-08-24 [SolarAccess.com] A U.S. group says a new poll shows that Americans overwhelmingly want action now to increase energy supplies, as well as more efforts in conservation and research. The Alliance for Energy & Economic Growth says a survey in July of 1,006 adults suggests that Americans view California’s lingering energy predicament as a warning signal that Congress should take bold action. Fully 78 percent of respondents were either “very” or “somewhat” concerned that problems seen in California could spread to other parts of the country. By more than a 2-to-1 margin, Americans believe legislation should go beyond research and conservation to include efforts designed to increase conventional supplies of oil, natural gas, coal and nuclear. The poll indicates that 95 percent think Congress should “adopt a balanced, comprehensive national energy policy designed to meet America’s growing energy needs.” “Americans clearly have a better understanding of the need to secure our energy future than many in Washington give them credit for,” says group spokesman Bruce Josten in an open letter to Congress. “These survey findings show the public wants leadership on the energy issue to prevent future price spikes and supply shortages.” Josten is executive vice president of the U.S. Chamber of Commerce. The Alliance represents 550 members that includes energy generation and distribution companies in a range of energy sources, including natural gas, oil, coal and nuclear. Key energy legislation is being debated now by the U.S. Congress, and Josten says the findings are confirmed by a new study from the Citizens for a Sound Economy Foundation, a grassroots advocacy organization. A study, ‘Abundant Energy: The Building Block of Prosperity,’ rebuts the claim that America can avoid developing new sources of energy and modernizing its energy transmission infrastructure simply by relying on improved efficiency and conservation. “We can’t meet our energy demand through conservation alone, unless we halt economic progress, and I think most Americans would reject that approach,” explains Josten.

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