Silfab Solar doubles U.S. manufacturing capacity with new facility

north american solar pv manufacturing
The company's highly-automated Burlington facility, located just 24 miles north of its Bellingham PV module assembly plant, is focusing on the Silfab Prime 370wt series module. (Courtesy: Silfab)

Solar PV manufacturer Silfab Solar has doubled its manufacturing capacity in the U.S. with the launch of a new facility in Washington state.

The company's highly-automated Burlington facility, located just 24 miles north of its Bellingham PV module assembly plant, is focusing on the Silfab Prime 370wt series module.

"Silfab has a long and successful history of optimizing North American manufacturing excellence and producing high-quality, extremely durable, and very efficient PV modules – exclusively designed and manufactured for the North American homeowner," Silfab CEO Paolo Maccario said. "Silfab's hallmarks – advanced engineering, superior quality, and high-touch customer service – will remain at the forefront of our ongoing expansion."

Silfab manufactures back-contact and mono PERC PV modules for the North American residential and commercial markets. The company also has facilities in Toronto, Canada.

"Northwest Washington provides Silfab with a highly trained and motivated labor force, a location that incentivizes innovation, and ideal transportation and shipping routes that complement our just-in-time manufacturing model," Maccario said.

Silfab's announcement is more good news for domestic solar PV manufacturing, which is facing supply chain constraints and global market pressures.

Earlier this month, Canadian-based solar panel module manufacturer Heliene launched a new facility in Riviera Beach, Florida, its third in North America.

Heliene is taking over the facility previously occupied by SolarTech Universal, which closed over a year ago, to produce its 66-cell HJT 370W module.

WATCH: Heliene CEO Martin Pochtaruk joined Renewable Energy World Content Director John Engel to discuss the new facility, global solar supply chain pressures, and the growth opportunity with heterojunction solar cell modules.

Subscribe to Renewable Energy World’s free, weekly newsletter for more stories like this

Previous articleVolvo receives world’s first fossil-free steel
Next articleMISO leads in renewable energy interconnection
John Engel is the Content Director for Renewable Energy World. For the past decade, John has worked as a journalist across various mediums -- print, digital, radio, and television -- covering sports, news, and politics. He lives in Asheville, North Carolina with his wife, Malia. Have a story idea or a pitch for Renewable Energy World? Email John at john.engel@clarionevents.com.

No posts to display