Rural Energy Supply Models Under Study

The International Solar Energy Society and the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems have developed a study to help governments, companies and financing institutions to develop rural energy supply activities. The ‘Rural Energy Supply Models’ (RESuM) was supported by the German Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety.

FREIBURG, Germany, DE, 2001-09-13 [SolarAccess.com] The International Solar Energy Society and the Fraunhofer Institute for Solar Energy Systems have developed a study to help governments, companies and financing institutions to develop rural energy supply activities. The ‘Rural Energy Supply Models’ (RESuM) was supported by the German Ministry for the Environment, Nature Conservation and Nuclear Safety. Two billion people around the world do not have access to grid electricity but “the technology and the people must be well suited to each other,” says Petra Schweizer-Ries of Fraunhofer. “The market is enormous.” In developing countries, ISES says reliable and affordable energy supply is crucial in the context of economic development and as a measure against poverty. It says there is a general consensus on the importance of improving the energy infrastructure on a sustainable basis, such as providing better access to locally available energy sources through implementation of regional energy concepts. RESuM provides a qualified tool as a guide intended to bridge the remaining gaps of knowledge on models for energy supply in rural areas. By presenting best practices in a structured format, the tool supports the preparation of projects, and an integrated platform has been established on the internet for the presentation of project results. The tool also enables users from developing countries to take part in the global debate, allowing them to exchange and discuss ideas and cooperate in putting them into effect. The results form the basis for bringing together market driven and sustainable development with electrification policy. The project identifies different model categories: cash, credit, leasing and service deployment. Different models, and their advantages and disadvantages, are presented, including aspects such as the contract between the system or service provider and the customer. The structural analysis is supported by project examples for each energy supply model. Current results of RESuM are available on the internet, where an integrated platform is available to enable users to access data and obtain support for decision making.
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