Korean scientists improve dye-sensitized solar cells

Researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) say they have come up with a way to vastly improve power conversion in dye-sensitized solar cells.

July 1, 2009 – Researchers from the Korea Institute of Science and Technology (KIST) say they have come up with a way to vastly improve power conversion in dye-sensitized solar cells.

In general terms, dye-sensitized solar cells combine a photosensitized anode and electrolyte made of porous thin films of TiO2 particles, with a dye layered on top. Sunlight activates the dyes to send a negative charge into the TiO2 and a positive charge into the electrolyte. Current cells offer about a 10%-11% efficiency, well below that of silicon-based PV cells.

In their work, published online June 28 by the journal Nature Materials and reported by the Korea Times and Yonhap, the KIST team used a sequential bonding of dyes separated into “stationary” and “mobile” phases. A porous TiO2 film filled with polystyrene served as a stationary phase, while a polymer containing a Brønsted-based material was the mobile phase. Controlling the release and accumulation of the substances enabled them to vertically align yellow, red, and green dyes within the TiO2 film. Absorbing dyes of different colors, means the solar cell can itself absorb a broader spectrum of sunlight, meaning higher conversion efficiencies — up to 16%.

Previous articleGreen-tech VC funds surge in 2Q
Next articleNacel Energy To Build 20-MW Texas Wind Project
Avatar

No posts to display