Clean Tech Venture Network Launched

With some clean technology market segments, such as solar energy, growing at 20 percent or more, a group of private investors has launched the Cleantech Venture Network to service one of the venture world’s next big stories. The firm will focus on technologies ranging from biodegradable materials to fuel cells to water purification systems.

Ann Arbor, Michigan – July 22, 2002 [SolarAccess.com] With some clean technology market segments, such as solar energy, growing at 20 percent or more, a group of private investors has launched the Cleantech Venture Network to service one of the venture world’s next big stories. The firm will focus on technologies ranging from biodegradable materials to fuel cells to water purification systems. Cleantech’s services include venture forums, investment reports, deal flow inventory and online services to investors and companies. CLEANTECH will introduce promising young companies to investors and introduce investors to quality deal-flow. The intent is to develop a community of money managers, business executives, professional advisors, and other stakeholders active in the clean technology-venturing arena. CLEANTECH’s first investment report will be released in September and first venture forum will be held in Toronto on November 13-14, followed by one in San Francisco. Clean technology saw investments of US$1.4 billion in early and expansion stage companies in the US in 2000 and early data suggests a similar amount in 2001. Certain segments are growing particularly fast: in the US, clean energy related companies received approximately US$750 million in 2000, up from US$442 million in 1999 and less than half that in 1998. CLEANTECH companies took approx 8 percent of venture dollars in Canada during the first quarter of 2002, up from virtually nothing the previous year. “Alongside the information revolution is an industrial revolution reshaping the design and manufacture of almost everything that we see around us,” said Cleantech Co-founder and Chairman Nicholas Parker. “The revolutionary products being developed today have dramatic improvements over the old because they are lighter, smarter and stronger; cheaper to manufacture and operate; less carbon-intensive and more energy efficient; offer greater service utility per unit of material input and enable virtually zero waste and/or emissions. This is a historical trend that is being accelerated by economic and ecological factors. The opportunities for venture investors are significant.”
Previous articleStudy: Public Transportation Best for Environment
Next articleAttorney’s General Push Bush on Climate Change

No posts to display