C&I

Renewable energy market momentum will continue into 2018, even if the policy needle continues to flutter in the months ahead. As utilities and clean energy firms will tell you, the world doesn’t wait for policy certainty. Consider this: emissions from power plants in 2017 are on track to be less than those from transportation for the first time in 40 years. Opportunities abound.
Grid Scale

When I started at Renewable Energy World in the fall of 2007 as a part-time news editor, the year 2020 seemed eons away. At that time, it was easy to write about how much of a particular region’s electricity would be supplied by renewable energy by 2020, because even though the numbers were very small in 2008, with 2020 so far away, predictions seemed easily plausible.
Baseload

There has been a steady stream of mergers and acquisitions (M&A) in the utility sector over the past several years. These transactions generally require public service commissions (PSC) approval in the states in which one or both of the parties have operations, and the PSCs are typically charged with approving only transactions that are in the public interest. 
Hydropower

Electric grids are mighty complicated. Of course, if you’re in the industry, you don’t need me to tell you that. When we created these huge networks of wires to pass electricity from generator to user, we simultaneously needed to track where the energy originated and where it went so we could figure out how to pay people for the energy they provided.
Off-Grid

The image that "off-grid" solar conjures of small cabins or individual solar home systems is outdated in today's world. es, it’s true, off-grid storage applications do include remote homes and even remote communities in some of world’s developing regions, but off-grid solar makes possible a wide range of applications from residential to commercial, and continues on a path of rapid growth.
Grid Scale

One year ago, at Solar Power International 2016, I helped Julia Hamm, CEO of the Smart Electric Power Alliance (SEPA) with a keynote "skit" in which I was a reporter interviewing a homeowner about her awareness of her energy use. The year was supposed to be 2026.
Baseload

How many times do you hear about the future of energy, the next generation of power applications or the future utility business model? Like me, you’re probably getting a little tired of it.