Policy & Regulation

Serbian “OneGiga” Solar Power Project Cancelled; Lawsuit Threatened

A 1 GW solar photovoltaic (PV) project which would have seen 100 10-MW solar power plants built in Serbia has been cancelled by its developer, Securum Equity Partners International Ltd of Malta. The company claims the Serbian government violated an agreement signed by both parties by failing to provide the promised 3,000 ha of land for the project by the agreed deadline, and says it plans to sue.

Xcel Energy’s Colorado Renewable Energy Plan Based on Flawed Study

This week, the Solar Energy Industries Association joined other renewable energy advocates, businesses, and environmental groups to urge the Colorado Public Utilities Commission to reject a new proposal from Xcel Energy that would discourage...

All Eyes on Gov. Cuomo as Lawmakers Miss Deadline for NY Solar Bill

The New York legislative session ended this week without lawmakers enacting the long-term solar policy we worked so hard to support — but there’s still plenty of opportunity to get the job done this year.

Solar Tax Credit Creates Opportunity for Indian Tribes

Many American Indian tribes have been considering business opportunities in connection with solar projects. To date, most of the focus has been with respect to the siting of utility scale solar projects on tribal land in the desert. For instance, the Moapa Band of Paiute Indians have leased land on their Nevada reservation for a 250 MW solar project being developed by kRoad Solar.

Tracking and Analyzing Energy Legislation Across the US

A new online database created by Colorado State University's (CSU) Center for the New Energy Economy (CNEE) aims to serve anyone interested in clean energy legislation in any state in the U.S., or even those who are crafting policy themselves.

Russian Renewable Energy Law Could Significantly Boost Clean Energy But Obstacles Remain

Hopes for Renewable Energy Source Development Measures (RESDM) in Russia's renewable power sector are high: if adopted and properly implemented, it will boost the renewable sector that is plagued with underfunding, often differing regional and federal legislation, other short-comings or simple ineffectiveness.

NYC Mayor Signs Legislation to Study Geothermal Feasibility

Mayor Bloomberg has signed legislation that will require the Office of Long Term Planning and Sustainability to study geothermal energy resources and the feasibility of developing them in New York City. The bill was sponsored by Council Members Gennaro, Garodnick, Brewer, Fidler, Gentile, James, Koppell, Lander, Mark-Viverito, Palma, Williams, Arroyo, Levin, Dromm, Van Bramer, Barron, Eugene, Greenfield, Jackson, Richards, Halloran and Ulrich.

IRS Confirms that Batteries Qualify for the Energy Tax Credit But Imposes Limitations

A recent IRS ruling confirms that batteries used to store solar electricity qualify for the 30% energy tax credit. At the same time, it imposes significant limits on the amount of the available credit if the battery also stores electricity drawn from the utility grid.

IRS Defines Start of Construction for the Production Tax Credit

The Internal Revenue Service explained today what developers must do this year to be considered to have started construction of new renewable energy projects.

Utility Solar Business Model Flaws: CPS Energy’s “SunCredit” Isn’t the Answer

As an owner of a small (16 kWp) PV plant, the local utility recently informed me that they would soon be discontinuing net metering in favor of a fixed payment per renewably produced kWh (cheerily termed a SunCredit), which is to be determined annually. Specifically, the retail value of a grid-delivered kWh is 9.9 cents while the value of a PV produced kWh is only 57% of that (5.6 cents). The remaining 4.3 cents per kWh is absorbed in the costs of transmission lines, transformers, administration, maintenance and the like.