Policy & Regulation

Australia’s Renewable Industry Imperiled Pending Policy Review

A government-appointed panel gave Australian Prime Minister Tony Abbott two options to cut emissions more cheaply: either scrap or weaken its main clean energy program.

Lubricating Energy Policy

The new report from the Taxpayers for Common Sense shows that oil companies paid just 11.7 percent of their U.S. income in federal taxes over the last five years, and the “smaller” companies included in the study that reported positive earnings only paid 3.7 percent. To achieve such a low tax rate, oil companies were able to take advantage of special tax breaks and loopholes that allowed them to defer more than $17 billion in taxes they would have otherwise owed.

Legislation May Usher in a New Golden Age for U.S. Hydropower

With its revival for fiscal year 2014, the Hydroelectric Production Incentives Program shows promise as a new federal revenue stream for hydro facilities.

Arizona Utilities Are not Supporting a Solar-Friendly Policy

Utility companies were originally allowed as a public service and were not-for-profit. It was never intended that this public service be a money making business, let alone one of the largest and wealthiest in the country.

German Lawmakers Vote to Reduce Renewable Energy Subsidies

German lawmakers backed an extensive revision of the country’s EEG clean-energy law to curb subsidies and slow gains in power prices that are the second-costliest in the European Union.

Wanted: An EU Biofuels Policy that Is Fair for All

At the beginning of 2014, the European Commission unveiled a policy framework for climate and energy from 2020 to 2030. In a controversial move, the Commission stated that it “does not think it appropriate to establish new targets for renewable energy or greenhouse gas intensity of fuels used in the transport sector or any other sub-sector after 2020.”

Ohio’s Clean Energy Law is Key to Unlocking Carbon Reductions

The question on people’s minds as we dig into the carbon pollution reduction standards proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency is – what does it mean for Ohio?

Landmark Legislation Could Put Geothermal Back on Track for California

The California Assembly is up next to consider a 500-megawatt (MW)-by-2024 geothermal procurement bill. This follows the May 28 passage of S.B. 1139 by the state Senate in a 21-11 vote. Electricity procured under this new geothermal bill would be separate from RPS-counted electricity. Industry, utilities, government agencies, and environmentalists say this bill is an answer that solves many time-sensitive problems at once. Some opponents, as stated in the May 28 Senate floor analysis, asked whether a mandate for geothermal in the case of this bill is fair and cost-effective. But geothermal companies working in California find fairness to be something they have been lacking and see this bill as a potential way to get geothermal valued properly.

The Populist Policy Problem

The forthcoming local and European elections are now less than two weeks away, and contending parties have been doggedly campaigning to increase their chances of securing seats both at home and in Brussels. One...

Factors that may make or break Kenya’s 5,000+MW power policy

  Factors that may make or break Kenya’s 5,000+MW power policy   http://www.businessdailyafrica.com/Opinion-and-Analysis/Factors-that-may-make-or-break-Kenya-s-5-000-MW-power-policy-/-/539548/2300086/-/jmpd79/-/index.html