Home Search

LOTTERY - SEARCH RESULTS

If you're not happy with the results, please do another search
Fifth and final tranche of CLEAN LA Solar opens

Fifth and final tranche of CLEAN LA Solar opens

After receiving approval from City Hall, the Los Angeles Department of Water and Power (LADWP) is moving ahead with the fifth and final tranche of its CLEAN LA Solar Program. LADWP will begin accepting applications on March 16. A total capacity of 25 megawatts (MW) is available at a price of $0.13/kWh for solar projects over 150 kW and $0.15/kWh […]
Don Quixote, Chasing Unicorns and Treasure Maps in the Solar Industry

Don Quixote, Chasing Unicorns and Treasure Maps in the Solar Industry

After over 30 years of struggle solar industry participants cannot be blamed for viewing the lucrative feed-in-tariff incentive model as the best hope for a stable market. Focusing on the photovoltaic industry, the market (in Europe) for PV systems seemed to move overnight from megawatt levels of demand to gigawatts with many believing that terawatt shipment years were soon to come. The accompanying shortage of polysilicon led to high levels of investment in thin film technologies as well as metallurgical grade silicon, CSP and CPV technologies — all focused on answering the cost piece of the PV conundrum.
The Best Peak Oil Investments, Part IX: The Methadone Economy

The Best Peak Oil Investments, Part IX: The Methadone Economy

No alternative fuel or combination of alternative fuels will allow our transportation system to operate the way it does today on oil. As oil becomes increasingly scarce and expensive, the way we get our transportation needs met will have to change. Understanding what the future of transportation may look like is key to making good investments in transportation.
Greening the Future of New Orleans

Greening the Future of New Orleans

Bruce Harris has a big smile on his face. Standing between his small FEMA trailer and peeling yellow house in the Lower 9th Ward of New Orleans, he points to a new inverter attached to the worn clapboard.
Directives Bode Well for UK Wind Energy

Directives Bode Well for UK Wind Energy

The British Wind Energy Association (BWEA), the largest renewable energy association in the UK, warmly welcomed the government's new Planning Policy Statement on renewable energy (PPS22) (Consultation Draft) published recently by the Office for the Deputy Prime Minister (ODPM).
Can Reforms Shift California Program from Controversy to Energy Storage Incentive Model?

Can Reforms Shift California Program from Controversy to Energy Storage Incentive Model?

The California Public Utilities Commission (CPUC) recently proposed a few changes to California’s Self-Generation Incentive Program (SGIP) that may begin to reshape the program into a national model for incentivizing energy storage deployment. Anyone involved in behind-the-meter energy storage project development in California is likely to have a bit of a love-hate relationship with SGIP. The program began back in 2001 when Assembly Bill 970 (Ducheny, 2000) directed the CPUC to offer financial incentives for utility customers to install on-site distributed energy technologies that reduced grid electricity consumption. In 2011, California Senate Bill 412 modified the primary purpose of SGIP from peak load reduction to greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions reductions, leading to CPUC modification of the criteria determining technology eligibility. Energy storage appeared on the SGIP scene in 2012 with two projects. Since then, SGIP has been a boon to the behind-the-meter energy storage market, helping California become a national leader in customer-sited storage resources. SGIP has a total annual budget of about $80 million per year and is expected to continue through 2019. But the program wasn’t designed with energy storage in mind, and debate over which technologies should be eligible has led to some controversy over the past few years. A sometimes heated debate has been ongoing around what exactly constitutes a GHG reducing technology. The argument has largely been focused on the inclusion of natural gas powered fuel cells as an eligible technology, with energy storage companies and many clean energy advocates wanting to see fuel cells removed from the program. After a CPUC decision in 2015, which continued to allow for fuel cell inclusion, the California legislature even weighed in with a letter to CPUC President Michael Picker expressing its deep disappointment in the decision. A second bit of controversy concerns alleged “gaming” of the system by certain energy storage companies. It appears a few companies may have taken advantage of some loose rules around reserving incentives during the latest round of SGIP solicitations. For example, one company was able to secure the first 56 online applications for the program, while others were locked out of the online platform. While the companies involved have stated they were acting within the specified rules, there appear to be some serious issues with how the program is currently administered. Now for some good news. The CPUC released a proposed decision last month detailing a number of reforms to SGIP that could help rework the program into an improved model for energy storage incentives. Not all of the changes are directly related to advanced storage technologies, but a few in particular could significantly impact how the program functions as a storage incentive. Rather than making additional funds available every year, SGIP shall be administered on a continuous basis with incentive levels declining based on the capacity reserved in the program, similar to the California Solar Initiative. The change may allow the program to be more flexible and reflective of actual market development conditions. The incentive budgets will be divided between two broad categories: energy storage and generation. Energy storage is allocated 75% of program funds, with 15% of the energy storage budget carved out for projects less than or equal to 10 kilowatts. Generation is allocated the remaining 25%, with 10% carved out for renewable generation projects. This is a big assurance for energy storage, mandating that 75 percent of the funds are devoted to this market segment; it’s also a boost for small-scale system deployment. A lottery will replace the first-come, first-served system when applications received on the same day request more incentives than the remaining budget at the current incentive step. Projects which have additional greenhouse gas/grid benefits will be given priority in the lottery. An attempt to resolve any “gaming” issues and reward those with greater GHG or grid benefits. Each participating project developer will be capped at a total of 20% of the incentive budget on a statewide basis. This replaces the previous 40% cap that applied to equipment manufacturers. The change would prevent any large developer from monopolizing SGIP incentives and give smaller developers more of a chance to take advantage of available incentives before they have been exhausted. On June 6th, 18 organizations submitted comments on the proposed decision with their own take on the issues. In analyzing comments from three major players – storage company Tesla, solar industry group California Solar Energy Industries Association (CALSEIA), and nonprofit SGIP administrator Center for Sustainable Energy (CSE) – there was a surprising degree of similarity between such diverse parties. In general, each was supportive of the CPUC’s proposed reforms. There was support for making funds available on a continuous basis and reducing current incentive levels. In fact, both CSE and CALSEIA called for even lower incentive levels. There was also agreement on the CPUC’s decision to shift incentives from a power (per kilowatt) basis to a capacity (per kilowatt-hour) basis. However, the organizations unanimously cautioned in their comments that this could lead to an over-incentive for longer duration systems that may not reinforce the goals of SGIP. As stated by Tesla, “The maximum allowable duration of energy storage that can receive SGIP incentives should be based on the ability of storage to meet the stated program goals of reducing emissions and supporting the grid.” Both Tesla and CALSEIA suggested that the incentive cap should be at six hours, while CSE suggested four hours would be appropriate. All three organizations argued that incentives should decline with increasing storage duration. The last main point of agreement concerns a proposal to require 260 hours of annual discharge for commercial energy storage systems. While each organization proposed a somewhat different method of altering this requirement, each agreed that it should be adjusted in light of the switch in compensation criteria from power to capacity. In all, there was little in the way of disagreement between Tesla, CALSEIA, and CSE. Their differences derived largely from the topics each organization chose to address, rather than from the conclusions they reached. While the final outcome is still very much up in the air for SGIP, it is positive to see much needed revisions being considered. Only time will tell the true effect any change to SGIP may ultimately have on California’s energy storage market, but many of the proposed changes appear to be taking the program at least a few steps in the right direction. So far, no state has implemented a truly targeted energy storage incentive program. Hopefully, a reformed SGIP will serve as a roadmap to successful program design and encourage other states to adopt similar measures.
Build It And They’ll Come: Georgia Power Kicks Off 210-MW Solar Program

Build It And They’ll Come: Georgia Power Kicks Off 210-MW Solar Program

Today (March 1) at 8:00 am EST, Georgia Power Company began accepting applications for its Advanced Solar Initiative (GPASI), a program that will add 210 megawatts of solar capacity over the next three years. This first deadline is for small and medium-sized facilities (up to 100 kW and 100 kW - 1 MW, respectively), for which the utility is seeking a total of 45 MW in each of the next two years. An additional 60 MW of utility-scale projects will be solicited for 2013 (that RFP goes out next month) and 2014, to be brought online in 2015 and 2016.
Beat autumn deadline to make most of cheaper business energy prices

Beat autumn deadline to make most of cheaper business energy prices

  With the peak autumn electricity purchasing deadline approaching, businesses are being encouraged to plan ahead to make the most of the cheapest wholesale energy prices for almost five years.   “For some years now, the overriding message has been that energy prices are only going one way – up. But this isn’t altogether true”, said Peter Pharoah, Head of […]
POWERGEN call for abstracts deadline extended to March 4: Shaping the Future of Generation Together

POWERGEN call for abstracts deadline extended to March 4: Shaping the Future of Generation Together

Success breeds success. Never waste a failure. The whole is greater than the sum of its parts. All of those above statements are clichés, of course, spoken at many a conference by many a speaker looking for a cohesive theme. They are also clichés because they are true. POWERGEN International has been around more than 30 years not because of […]
Beijing Sets Plan for Massive EV Adoption

Beijing Sets Plan for Massive EV Adoption

A tentative subsidy for purchasing electric vehicles (EVs) for personal use in Beijing has passed reviews by several government ministries and commissions with oversight authority and is expected to go into effect soon.