China Says It Will Not Set Carbon Cap

Although several major newspapers of record reported in May that China’s National Development and Reform Commission (NDRC) had proposed introducing a cap on greenhouse gases from 2016, the nation says it has no such plan.

The Financial Times had reported that Jiang Kejun, a carbon policy researcher with the NDRC, said China was considering an emissions cap for the 13th five-year plan (2016-2020) and was looking into appropriate levels.

Su Wei, China’s chief climate negotiator and director-general of the NDRC’s department of climate change, dismissed the news reports in a Bloomberg interview while noting that China will uphold its current agreement to cut its carbon intensity (a measure of carbon emissions in relation to economic output) by around 40 percent of 2005 levels by 2020. Su’s comments are the first by a senior Chinese negotiator since the reports were published.

“There are lots of ways we can achieve the carbon-intensity target by 2020,” Su said. “We would certainly make arrangements in both the 12th and 13th five-year plans to achieve that objective.” NDRC has announced plans to launch a carbon trading scheme in Shenzhen, which will cover 638 companies that produce 38 percent of the city’s emissions. Six other locations plan to roll out the scheme in before 2014.

China accounts for almost one quarter of global CO2 emissions.  

This article is part of our regional news briefs in the upcoming completely redesigned Renewable Energy World digital magazine. Subscribe here to recieve a free copy.

Lead image: Smokestack via Shutterstock

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