Oil Leader to Receive Renewable Energy Award

The chairman of one of the world’s largest oil companies will receive an award for the company’s growing role in renewable energy.

WASHINGTON, DC, US, 2001-06-20 [SolarAccess.com] The chairman of one of the world’s largest oil companies will receive an award for the company’s growing role in renewable energy. Sir Mark Moody-Stuart of the Royal Dutch/Shell Group will receive the ‘Building a Better World’ award from CH2M HILL at a ceremony Thursday at the Smithsonian Castle in Washington. The award was first presented in 1998 to William Ruckleshaus, former Administrator of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, for vision and actions that make a significant difference toward improving the lives and prospects of people and society. Moody-Stuart, who has been at Shell for 34 years, has shifted the operating philosophy of the oil and petrochemical firm to focus on environmental performance and has launched a significant development of renewable energy, including wind generation, fuel cells and biomass fuels. Shell companies have developed management frameworks to support the shift toward more environmentally efficient practices and wiser use of natural resources. Moody-Stuart is co-chair of the G8 Renewable Energy Task Force with Italian Environment Ministry Director General, Corrado Clini. The Task Force was established during the G8 summit in July 2000, and is forming innovative approaches and strategies for the deployment of renewable energy technologies as part of a balanced energy portfolio in both developed and developing countries. “As a corporate leader, Sir Mark understands that financial, social and environmental decisions are of equal importance to a company’s long-term success,” explains CH2M HILL chairman and CEO Ralph Peterson. “He sees the tremendous potential Shell has for improving social and environmental conditions around the world, and he has worked tirelessly to realize that potential throughout the company.” Shell was one of the first oil companies to acknowledge the connection between greenhouse gas emissions and global climate change. It has reduced its internal GHG emissions 11 percent below 1990 levels and includes the cost of carbon in major project decisions. The 60-year-old Moody-Stuart has been chairman of Shell since 1998.

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