Nevada Hot Springs Ripe for Geothermal Power

Pumpernickel Valley in Nevada has always had hot springs, but now that Nevada Geothermal Power (NGP) is done with initial testing the area could put its natural assets to power use. NGP subsidiary Noramex owns the private geothermal leases to the Pumpernickel Geothermal Project. They plan to complete federal lease applications that would allow the company to form a contiguous package of eight sections with potential for the discovery of a high temperature reservoir suitable for electric power generation.

Vancouver, British Columbia – August 6, 2004 [SolarAccess.com] Nevada’s geothermal output is expected to increase significantly in the next decade to meet power demands, and to comply with renewable portfolio legislation that requires the state to increase its renewable energy use from 5 to 15 percent over the next ten years. NGP is using information gathered from Magma Power and the University of Nevada System (UNS) to help determine the viability of a geothermal power plant in the valley. Magma Power drilled at the site in 1974 and reported temperatures of 275 degrees F at a depth of 3,071-feet. In the early 1980s, UNS conducted an aerial assessment of the valley area under a contract with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Fieldwork included geologic reconnaissance, satellite imagery, hot spring geochemistry, air photo analysis, 2-meter depth temperature probe survey, gravity survey, soil mercury survey and temperature gradient drilling. Based on these findings, NGP is planning a two-phase approach to complete a feasibility assessment. Phase one will map the deep geothermal water sources by drilling gradient wells, and phase two will confirm the resource map through a deep core drill of 3,900-feet so flow and injection tests can be completed. NGP also plans to develop a 30 MW geothermal power generation plant at Blue Mountain in Nevada where the company owns 12 square-miles of geothermal leases.

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