Kite Surfing – Powered by Vegetable Oil!

This Boxing Day, as families enjoy sunshine, food, and post-Christmas cheer, four energetic activists will pour a dark liquid made from vegetable oil into the fuel tanks of their diesel trucks and embark on a 2300 km adventure.

MELBOURNE, AUSTRALIA – December 21, 2000 (RENN) – This Boxing Day, as families enjoy sunshine, food, and post-Christmas cheer , four energetic activists will pour a dark liquid made from vegetable oil into the fuel tanks of their diesel trucks and embark on a 2300 km adventure. The purpose of their trek is to showcase a revolutionary fuel created from vegetable oil called “biodiesel” at the same time enjoying the spoils of the Australian Coast with some extreme sports. Demonstrating how enjoying the environment does not have to destroy it! They call their trip, “Kite Surfing on Veggie Oil,” because as they travel the coast in vegetable oil-powered vehicles, the team will be kite surfing, mountain biking, white water rafting, rock climbing, fishing and any other form of good, clean fun. When asked why Kite Surfing and biodiesel? “As a group, we are passionate about renewable energy and the environment. We decided earlier this year that a demonstration of biodiesel would be highlighted with some of our other passions – powered by nature or us. You might call this the Ultimate Renewable Energy Adventure!” – said Adrian Lake. Going on “Kite Surfing on Veggie Oil” are Melbourne-born author Joshua Tickell, as well as Alex Sanz, kite surfer and extreme sports enthusiast, Adrian Lake, founder of the BAA, and Penny Laine, graphic designer and travel enthusiast. The Biodiesel Association of Australia (BAA), is a group dedicated to bringing about the widespread adoption of this environmentally friendly, renewable and cost effective fuel. While the emphasis of this trip is to have fun and share the fun with all those willing to participate, the growth of a Biodiesel industry in Australia is a serious matter. Joshua Tickell, author of “From the Fryer to the Fuel Tank, the Complete Guide to Using Vegetable Oil as an Alternative Fuel” is coming to Australia to have fun and advocate the use of biodiesel as a petroleum diesel fuel substitute. Joshua and his “Veggie Van” have become a cultural icon in the USA – During his 20,000km vegetable oil powered trip around the USA, he entertained consistent coverage from CNN and logged over 1 million visitors to the Veggie Van web site at www.veggievan.org. Vegetable oil is easily processed to create biodiesel which powers any unmodified diesel engine, including those used in cars, buses, boats, generators, and heavy transport vehicles. In fact, Dr. Rudolf Diesel actually designed the original Diesel engine to run on straight vegetable oil over a hundred years ago. The benefits of using biodiesel in Australia are enormous: – Growth in rural economies. – Reduced dependence on imported fuel. – Improvement in Australia’s balance of trade. – Massive reduction in Greenhouse Emissions. – Reduction of sulphur dioxide, one of the main causes of acid rain. – Reduction of other cancer causing emissions such as benzene. – Cheaper Fuel. The challenges are enormous too – getting biodiesel into circulation is big job. But according to Adrian Lake, the BAA is ready. “This is our first large-scale project to put biodiesel in the hands of the public. But we will promote biodiesel until it is as normal as petrol.” Whether you cover rural issues, resources, the environment, extreme sport or simply “The latest and greatest” there is plenty of grist for the mill (especially if it’s a seed-oil crushing mill) But just because Biodiesel is a serious issue with the potential for enormous positive economic, employment and environmental impacts it does not mean that covering it has to be a chore. So, as we pass through your local area, join us for a spot of fishing, a thrash at kite surfing (or whatever the activity of the day is), come and drive in a biodiesel powered vehicle or a discussion of Biodiesel’s future.

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