Biomass Could Displace 30% of Petroleum Use

Relief from soaring prices at the gas pump could come in the form of corncobs, cornstalks, switchgrass and other types of biomass, according to a joint feasibility study from the departments of Agriculture and Energy.

The Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) report outlines a national strategy in which 1 billion dry tons of biomass would displace 30 percent of the nation’s petroleum consumption for transportation. The scenario could supply more than 3 percent of the nation’s energy, according to the report, and biomass has already surpassed hydropower as the largest domestic source of renewable energy. Researchers who worked on the study believe much potential remains. The report, titled “Biomass as Feedstock for a Bioenergy and Bioproducts Industry: The Technical Feasibility of a Billion-Ton Annual Supply,” was sponsored by DOE’s Office of Energy Efficiency and Renwable Energy, Office of Biomass Program. “Our report answers several key questions,” said Bob Perlack, a member of ORNL’s Environmental Sciences Division and a co-author of the report. “We wanted to know how large a role biomass could play, whether the United States has the land resources and whether such a plan would be economically viable.” Nearly half of the 2,263 million acres that comprise the land base of the U.S. has potential for growing biomass. About 33 percent of the land area is classified as forest, 26 percent as grassland, 20 percent as cropland, 13 percent as urban areas, swamps and deserts, and 8 percent as special uses such as public facilities. Looking at just forestland and agricultural land, which are the two largest potential biomass sources, the study found potential exceeding 1.3 billion dry tons per year. That amount is enough to produce biofuels to meet more than one-third of the current demand for transportation fuels, according to the report. Such an amount would represent a six-fold increase in production from the amount of biomass produced today, and the increase could be achieved with only relatively modest changes in land use and agricultural and forestry practices, the report states. “One of the main points of the report is that the United States can produce nearly 1 billion dry tons of biomass annually from agricultural lands and still continue to meet food, feed and export demands,” said Robin Graham, leader for Ecosystem and Plant Sciences in ORNL’s Environmental Sciences Division. The benefits of an increased focus on biomass include increased energy security, as the U.S. would become less dependent on foreign oil, a potential 10 percent reduction in greenhouse gas emissions and an improved rural economic picture. Current production of ethanol is about 3.4 billion gallons per year, but that total could reach 80 billion gallons or more under the scenario outlined in the report. Such an increase in ethanol production would see transportation fuels from biomass increase from 0.5 percent of U.S. consumption in 2001 to 4 percent in 2010, up to 10 percent in 2020 and 20 percent in 2030. In fact, depending on several factors, biomass could supply 15 percent of the nation’s energy by 2030. Biomass consumption in the industrial sector could increase at an annual rate of 2 percent through 2030, while biomass consumption by electric utilities would double every 10 years through 2030. During the same time, production of chemicals and materials from bio-based products would increase from about 12.5 billion pounds, or 5 percent of the current production of target U.S. chemical commodities in 2001, to 12 percent in 2010, 18 percent in 2020 and 25 percent in 2030.
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