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How can Renewable Energy Technology be extensively adopted in Developing Nations

How can Renewable Energy Technology be extensively adopted in Developing Nations

This is an excerpt of an Article I contributed to Energy Manager April-July Issue.     Renewable Energy is central to sustainable economic development; it moderates growth of energy demand contributes towards the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions, and significantly lowers dependency on oil. Renewable Energy Technologies are systems of harnessing infinite energy for human use. The systems include but are not […]
A Cleantech Recipe that Finally Works: Student Entrepreneurs

A Cleantech Recipe that Finally Works: Student Entrepreneurs

“Cleantech,” once a sexy term for innovations from tech engineers creating products like thin film solar panels and futuristic batteries, has turned into a plagued phrase in recent years, as billions of grants, loans, investments, and tax breaks have been poured into the sector, only to result in a lack of anticipated breakthroughs and a series of expensive tax-funded failures.
New York City and Residential Solar: A Recipe for Success

New York City and Residential Solar: A Recipe for Success

New York City houses thousands of buildings that loom into the skyline, sparkling in the sun. These buildings serve as apartments, restaurants, shops and business offices to millions of people. Because the city reaches for the sky already, it’s no wonder they are trending toward solar power now, especially expanding in residential solar. Solar Shining in New York In fact, according to New York officials, residents are installing home solar panels at a rate almost 28.5 times higher than in 2011! The Solar Energy Industries Association credits this furious incline to the fact that solar costs have plummeted 70% in recent years. When the state added in incentives, they mixed the recipe necessary for a steep upward slope in residential solar. New York residents are not only donning their homes in solar but also their apartments and townhouses too. Of course, this surge demands more solar installation workers. Within ten years, the Economic Development Corporation noticed that installation companies multiplied over 11 times, driving prices even lower as the businesses competed. New York City’s now roaring solar industry brought the installation cost somewhere between 20 and 50 grand. Still, David Sandbank from the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority says that residents can reduce their bill by 50% with state credits and incentives! Many are encouraged to take the plunge in going solar and are reaping the rewards of their investment. One New York family knew they wanted home solar panels, but they needed someone to talk them through the solar process. Once they understood the benefits, going solar was a no–brainer. They even paid off a good portion of their loan with the state and federal incentives while shaving off almost 85% of their energy bill! As more people are installing home solar panels in the city, the government has worked to lessen the time spent dotting i’s and crossing t’s. Tria Case, City University of New York’s director of sustainability, says they needed more coordination to speed up the process. Solar Challenges in the Big Apple Still, the big city has more to improve if they want the solar trend to continue. Many homes dotting the inner city find solar energy difficult to use. The skyscraper down the street blocks the sunlight for their panels, causing problems with efficiency. Another challenge residents must overcome is the city’s fire codes. President of Best Energy Power Ronnie Mandler says these codes prevent companies from installing enough panels to cover the homes’ needs. To meet city guidelines, residents need six feet of cleared space, including on the outskirts of the roof and around doors or skylights. In addition to the fire code and towering buildings, another hurdle in residential solar is the housing industry. The city wants its housing co-ops to make the switch, but many of these businesses hesitate to spend the upfront cost. Solar Future Still Bright Even as the city faces such challenges to solar energy, they still show a huge interest in this sustainable resource. Mayor Bill de Blasio has encouraged the residents’ interest, resolving to reduce greenhouse gases by 80% over the next 34 years. To display his support for residential solar, the mayor revealed new solar panels dressing up the Brooklyn Navy Yard’s roof.   Follow Palmetto Solar on our Facebook and Twitter pages. Stay up to date on the latest solar news and clean energy updates. We explore a huge selection of solar energy topics from sources including top news organizations and indie publications. We compile the latest info that you want and make it easy to share with others.   Palmetto Palmetto.com  
Software for Homemade Biodiesel

Software for Homemade Biodiesel

Touch & Talk Software International recently announced the release of the H2 Power Core Software Suite that allows people to make their own hydrogen generator, E85 ethanol or biodiesel fuel to improve fuel economy and help American's become fuel independent. The H2 Power Core Software hydrogen generator module includes an in-depth study of the technology and safety considerations required to build a hydrogen generator for use in cars and trucks. This module includes a detailed listing of tools, parts and source information as well as photos and detailed instructions required to safely build a hydrogen generator. The E85 ethanol and biodiesel modules include an in-depth study of the technology and safety considerations required to make E85 ethanol or biodiesel fuels for cars and trucks. The modules contain detailed listings of both the tools and parts required to make clean burning fuel from renewable crop sources. The H2 Power Core Software Suite also includes an effective fuel additive recipe that can be used in either gas or diesel engines to increase mileage for both cars and trucks.
NJIT Researchers Develop Process to Paint on Solar Panels

NJIT Researchers Develop Process to Paint on Solar Panels

Researchers at New Jersey Institute of Technology (NJIT) have developed an inexpensive solar cell that can be painted or printed on flexible plastic sheets.
Kreido Biofuels Meets ASTM Specs on Multiple Feedstocks

Kreido Biofuels Meets ASTM Specs on Multiple Feedstocks

To meet ASTM specifications for the conversion of oil to methyl ester, Kreido Biofuels, Inc. has successfully tested degummed soy bean oil, refined palm, jatropha, canola, castor, and soy oil as feedstocks for use in its STT 30G processors.
Kreido Biofuels Set to Advance Biodiesel

Kreido Biofuels Set to Advance Biodiesel

Kreido Laboratories completed a reverse merger with publicly held company Gemwood Productions, Inc. To operate under the name Kreido Biofuels, Inc., the new company will pursue Kreido Laboratories' renewable energy and process intensification business.
Experts discuss 2010 outlook at Thin Film Solar Summit

Experts discuss 2010 outlook at Thin Film Solar Summit

Industry experts weighed in on the outlook for thin-film photovoltaics at last week's second annual Thin-Film Solar Summit in San Francisco -- but deciding what is needed to compete with crystalline silicon PV and the outlook for 2010 depended in part on which segment was being represented.
Aerographite: The World’s Lightest Material Could Advance EVs

Aerographite: The World’s Lightest Material Could Advance EVs

Weighing in at only 0.2 milligrams per cubic centimeter, a new material called Aerographite is now the world's lightest. Electrically conductive and highly compressible, the material could one day be used in batteries to help advance green transportation.
Seafaring Biofuels: Finding the Right Fuel for the Fleet

Seafaring Biofuels: Finding the Right Fuel for the Fleet

As the largest user of diesel in the U.S., the Navy is vulnerable to disruptions in fuel supply. To help in the search for alternative fuels, the Navy has awarded a $2 million grant to a University of Wisconsin engineering professor to find the right fuel for the fleet.