Grid Scale, Microgrids, Solar, Storage

Indoor Li-ion energy storage system hooks into Shimizu microgrid for study

Mitsubishi Heavy Industries delivered a large-capacity, indoor, lithium-ion rechargeable battery energy storage system to the Shimizu Institute of Technology for tests with the institute’s mixed-power-source microgrid.

December 29, 2011 – ENP Newswire — Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd. (MHI) delivered a large-capacity, indoor, lithium-ion rechargeable battery energy storage system to the Shimizu Institute of Technology in Tokyo. The system will be used in tests with the institute’s mixed-power-source microgrid.

The institute, a technology arm of Japanese construction firm Shimizu Corporation, runs a 600kW microgrid powered by photovoltaic generation systems, as well as other power sources. It conducts verification testing and other advanced studies on microgrids, building and energy management systems (BEMS), and other technologies.

The MHI energy storage system, comprising batteries, racks, a DC/AC converter, and controls, is capable of 100kW output and storage of 60kWh. It uses 320 units of a 50 Ah (ampere hour) class cell. The indoor system is one of the largest of its kind in Japan, and MHI reports that its energy density is 2-3X higher than lead-acid or nickel-hydride battery types. It can also supply higher power output in a short time.

MHI and Shimizu will jointly conduct tests using the energy storage system and verification of the microgrid system for stationary energy needs, such as in multi-unit apartment buildings. MHI will accumulate storage system management data for environmental and economic improvements during Shimizu’s verification testing. MHI anticipates that the collaboration will help it create an energy storage market and enter the “smart community” market of energy-efficient, low-carbon city infrastructure.

MHI also developed Japan’s first container-type megawatt-class energy storage system, using more than 2,000 units of lithium-ion cell, targeting grid balancing applications for unstable power areas, peak demand times, and integration of intermittent renewable energy sources like solar and wind.

Copyright 2011 Normans Media Limited.

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