DER, Microgrids, Microgrids, Solar

Campus microgrids a $777M market by 2017

Microgrids, pockets of distributed energy resources that can be isolated from the utility power grid, have been called “the ultimate example of energy democracy,” diversifying supply infrastructure ownership, says Pike Research.

December 21, 2011 — Microgrids, pockets of distributed energy resources that can be isolated from the utility power grid, have been called “the ultimate example of energy democracy,” diversifying supply infrastructure ownership, says Pike Research. Campus environments are the largest sector of grid-connected microgrids globally: educational institutions, hospitals, the military, and some large corporations.

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Campus-style microgrids manage energy with on-site electric and thermal generation and loads, within an existing energy infrastructure. Microgrids offer greater autonomy and control of energy futures for financially secure enterprises. The campus microgrid represents “increased efficiency, greater reliability, and the potential for new revenue streams from the provision of ancillary grid services,” said senior analyst Peter Asmus.

Total installed generation capacity for campus microgrids will increase by 164% between 2011 and 2017, rising from 620 megawatts (MW) to 1.6 gigawatts (GW), shows Pike Research’s report. By the end of 2017, the campus microgrid market will reach $777 million in annual revenue.

The US is the best overall market for grid-connected microgrids for most application segments, including campus environments, Pike Research shows, citing numerous contributing factors. Under Pike Research?s average forecast scenario for campus microgrid deployment, the North American education campus environment segment will reach 1.2GW by 2017, rising at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 17.5% between 2011 and 2017. The North American campus environment sector will reach 1.5GW out of a world total of 1.6GW — greater than 95% market share.

One example, the 10-campus University of California (UC) system, instituted a comprehensive energy policy to get 20% of its electricity needs met with renewable sources by 2017 and 10% of its energy from locally generated clean sources by 2014. Another element in the UC system is reducing energy consumption by 10% by 2014.

Pike Research?s report, Microgrids for Campus Environments, examines current market dynamics, as well as the longer-term market potential, for campus microgrids in the commercial, education, government, healthcare, industrial and research campus application segments. The study analyzes the demand-side dynamics that are driving increased interest in campus microgrids, the key enabling technologies for these systems, and the industry players who are shaping this emerging market. Market forecasts for installed capacity and revenue are provided through 2017, segmented by world region and campus type. Access it here: http://www.pikeresearch.com/research/microgrids-for-campus-environments

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