Bioenergy

Ethanol Plants and Processes All Across the Country

Even though the domestic ethanol industry is on edge over talk in Congress of lawmakers removing protectionist tariffs on international ethanol, ethanol plants and processes are going up far and wide.

One 50 mgy ethanol plant, just announced by Green Plains Renewable Energy (GPRE) for Shenandoah, Iowa, has received its air permit from the Iowa Department of Natural Resources. The construction will begin this month, at which point they intend to lay the foundations for the beer well and fermentation tanks for a production date in spring of 2007. For Spiritwood, North Dakota, the Associated Press reports “a proposed $350 million ethanol plant and coal-fired steam plant is getting a boost from a local economic development group. The Jamestown-Stutsman Development Corp. is investing $6 million in the effort — a $4 million grant over 3 1/2 years and the purchase of $2 million in Spiritwood Energy LLC stock. … The 100 million gallon a year ethanol plant and steam power plant is planned in Spiritwood, about 10 miles east of Jamestown.” A groundbreaking in Charles City, Iowa, will lead to construction of north Iowa’s newest ethanol plant, the Associated Press reports. “The plant is located just west of Charles City and is being built by VeraSun Energy, a Brookings, South Dakota company that also operates an ethanol plant in Fort Dodge. The plant in Charles City will have an annual capacity of 110 (m) million gallons and is scheduled to be complete by the summer of 2007. VeraSun believes about 50 people will work in the new plant.” A recent development in Boca Raton, Florida, had led to successful testing of extracting ethanol from pineapple fruit and pineapple plant waste. Biomass Resources Corporation reports it has established methods of processing both the ingestible produce (fruit/vegetable) and the plant waste product to mine valuable byproduct extractions and has established a 5,000 sq. ft. R&D and production facility outside of Cali, Columbia for this purpose. Byproducts include cellulose and hemi-cellulose; bromelain, enzymes found in pineapple juice and in the stem of pineapple plants; xylitol, lignin, and protein-laden plant waste.