Solar

Solargenix Brings Solar Thermal to Chicago

It’s all about Chicago this week. Even though wind power are the buzzwords of the city since the industry’s major global conference just came to a close, a major solar energy development deal has just been inked with the city. On the heels of landing a contract for construction of the first commercial solar thermal power plant since 1990, Solargenix Energy secured an important contract for a high-capacity manufacturing facility for their solar thermal collectors.

Chicago, Illinois – April 2, 2004 [SolarAccess.com] It’s all about Chicago this week. Even though wind power is the buzzword of the city since the industry’s major global conference just came to a close, a major solar energy development deal has just been inked with the city. On the heels of landing a contract for construction of the first commercial solar thermal power plant since 1990, Solargenix Energy secured an important contract for a high-capacity manufacturing facility for their solar thermal collectors. The company reached an agreement to complete a multi-million dollar procurement contract between the City of Chicago and its partners: CHA, City Colleges, CTA, and the Park District. The agreement will provide the initial market for a solar thermal manufacturing facility to be located in the city, making Chicago the only U.S. city to have both solar thermal and photovoltaic (PV) solar manufacturing facilities. The agreement outlines: – The establishment of a new site for the first high capacity solar thermal manufacturing in the U.S. in nearly fifteen years – A marketing, sales and project administration office – The purchase of solar thermal products, systems, engineering and installation services – Education and training programs to promote the use of solar thermal technologies New Horizons for Solargenix The ability for Solargenix to manufacture solar thermal collectors at high capacity, thus targeting commercial and large scale customers will open up the company’s horizons — and more importantly, provide diversification of their business, according to renewable energy industry analyst Scott Sklar of Washington D.C. based Stella group. “Solargenix Energy’s approach to offer a portfolio of solar thermal products for large buildings – water heating, industrial process heat, air-conditioning, daylighting, electric grid power augmentation and larger-scale grid generation — assures that the company can play multiple markets thus coping with the ups and downs in energy equipment sales in key sectors,” Sklar said. While Solargenix will initially fill approximately 15 manufacturing positions, the company also will sustain job opportunities indirectly through conducting business with other Chicago-based companies that will provide equipment, materials, engineering and field services. “Solargenix is proud that the City of Chicago has chosen us as their solar thermal partner in taking the next logical step forward in supporting the use of renewable energy,” said John F. Myles III, CEO and president of Solargenix. “Our company has been dedicated for years to the advancement of emerging solar thermal technologies and Chicago provides a perfect location to manufacture our products and showcase our offerings. Solargenix is especially pleased to be a part of creating new jobs in the city and to help revitalize one of the city’s historic buildings.” Chicago City Backing for Renewable Energy To support the use of solar thermal energy, the city and its partners have committed to organize and fund a number of promotional and educational programs, including a training program for building officials and city inspectors that will be developed, coordinated and led by Solargenix. Other training and education programs will be developed for institutional, commercial and retail energy users. The agreement with the City of Chicago provides for the use of Solargenix’s products on city-owned properties such as parks, swimming pools, housing, fire departments correctional facilities and hospitals. Additionally, the company will develop a regional network of dealers and installers to market the solar thermal products and systems built in Chicago. The use of solar thermal products and systems for cooling, space heating, water heating and process heat in city buildings will expand on the policies and programs the city has recently set forth to reduce energy use in buildings and increase the city’s use of “green” technologies. At the factory unveiling, from left to right: Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daly, John Myles, CEO and President of Solargenix and TV Personality & Solar Activist Art Linkletter. “Renewable energy, whether from the sun or the wind, is a growth industry, and I believe Chicago has the potential to become a major player in that field,” Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley said. Located at 3622 S. Morgan St. in historic Bridgeport, the Solargenix manufacturing facility will have a capacity to make solar thermal collectors capable of producing over 10 MW (approximately 12,000 solar thermal collectors/year) with a potential expansion to produce more than 30 MW (36,000 solar thermal collectors/year) of solar thermal collectors annually. Technology Hits Close to Home The basis for Solargenix’s technology stems from a long-standing partnership with the University of Chicago. Roland Winston, founding Professor at the University of California, Merced and senior scientist in the Enrico Fermi institute at the University of Chicago pioneered the development of Non-Imaging Optics technology that has proven the capability to concentrate sunlight at more than 84,000 times the natural level of Earth-surface sunlight. This patented technology has resulted in products and supplies to cool buildings, generate electricity and provide heat for industrial processes. Non-Imaging Optics improves the efficiency of converting solar energy to thermal energy when incorporated into the design of concentrating solar collectors. The collectors are utilized in many different configurations – fixed arrays or tracking systems, ground-mounted, as well as building-integrated systems that utilize roofs and wall areas.