Project Development, Utility Scale, Wind Power

Shell WindEnergy Adds 61.5 MW to Portfolio

Shell Renewables announced the acquisition of project development company Whitewater Hill Wind Partners, LLC. The company’s U.S. wind energy operations, Shell WindEnergy Inc. has signed an agreement with CPC Development Corporation, an affiliate of Cannon Power Corporation, to acquire their project company developing the 61.5 MW Whitewater Hill wind park in the San Gorgonio Pass. The acquisition will bring Shell WindEnergy’s capacity in the US to 230 MW.

Houston, Texas – July 24, 2002 [SolarAccess.com] The Whitewater Hill wind park, which will be built by Cannon Power Corporation with GE 1.5 MW turbines, is scheduled to begin generating electricity by the end of August 2002. This is the second agreement that Shell WindEnergy Inc. has signed with Cannon Power. In May the company announced its intention to purchase the 41MW Cabazon Pass wind park, also due for completion in August 2002. California pioneered wind development in the US, being the first state to develop large-scale wind parks in the early 1980s. The San Gorgonio Pass has over 1,300 turbines installed. The Whitewater Hill project is a good example of how more powerful turbines can be installed alongside existing smaller machines to increase the power density of a site. “We are very pleased to acquire the Whitewater Hill wind park, which together with the Cabazon Pass facility, currently under construction, takes our capacity in the Palm Springs area to over a 100 MW and increases our total US capacity to more than 230 MW,” said David Jones, Chairman of Shell WindEnergy. Earlier this month Shell, as part of the NoordzeeWind consortium, signed an agreement with the Government of the Netherlands for the development of the 100 MW Near Shore Wind Park at Egmond-aan-Zee. Overall, more than 3,000 MW of wind energy projects are currently being developed or evaluated by Shell in the US and Europe. Shell WindEnergy Inc. owns two other wind parks in the US – Rock River (50 MW) in Wyoming and White Deer (80 MW) in Texas.