Hydropower, Project Development, Wind Power

Green Buildings Program Launched in Massachusetts

Massachusetts Technology Collaborative (MTC) has announced a new US$14.6 million program to spur the development of “green buildings” that are highly energy efficient and incorporate Renewable Energy Technologies. The program will provide grandest through a competitive process to assist with early-stage feasibility studies as well as design and construction of new facilities.

WESTBOROUGH, Massachusetts 2002-03-26[SolarAccess.com] Targeted funding to jumpstart the development of green buildings comes from the state’s $US150 million Renewable Energy Trust, which was established to promote the supply and use of Renewable Energy sources such as wind turbines, solar, hydroelectric and fuel cells. “This financing offers a powerful incentive that will lead to some of the most energy efficient buildings ever constructed in Massachusetts,” said MTC Executive Director Mitchell Adams. “Working with developers, architects and financial institutions, the program will support the creation of prototype facilities that will provide a blueprint for future projects looking to integrate clean energy technologies as a way to reduce operating costs and help the environment.” Buildings use approximately two-thirds of all electricity consumed in the United States and are responsible for at least one-third of peak electrical demand. Constructing green buildings will reduce the strain on current resources by maximizing the use of clean Renewable Energy, high performance building design and energy efficiency measures. Awards of up to $500,000 are available under the program for design and construction assistance. Other awards are available for feasibility studies, public awareness and public education activities. “Through our environmental review process at the Executive Office of Environmental Affairs, we encourage developers to use Renewable Energy technology such as passive heating and gray water systems in their buildings,” said Bob Durand, Secretary of Environmental Affairs. “If we are to create a sustainable future, one where we do not deplete our natural resources or depend heavily on foreign sources for energy, we must reduce our energy consumption as much as possible using these kinds of conservation methods.”