Bioenergy, C&I, Geothermal, Hydropower, Solar, Wind Power

U.S. Utilities Can Use Green-e Logo

Utilities in the United States can use the Green-e logo to indicate that their electricity contains renewable energy.

SAN FRANCISCO, California, US, 2001-12-07 [SolarAccess.com] The Green-e certification program has agreed to allow utilities with accredited green pricing programs to use its logo, providing the utility program meets minimum content requirements for wind, solar and other eligible renewable energy sources. Commercial and industrial customers that purchase green power through these accredited utility programs can use the logo in accordance with Green-e’s existing secondary use standards. Green accreditation standards exist in Colorado, Wisconsin and Iowa, as well as the territory of the Tennessee Valley Authority. The standards are being developed in Florida, Georgia and Minnesota. Green-e has also accredited utility programs of Madison Gas & Electric, Wisconsin Electric and TVA. The Green-e and Green Pricing Accreditation boards will develop implementation and logo use guidelines for accredited utilities, which officials say will allow utility customers to easily identify renewable energy offerings that meet environmental and consumer protection standards. At a meeting in October, the Green Pricing Accreditation Board also approved terms for the use of Tradable Renewable Energy Certificates (known as T-REC or green tags). The language is similar to the Green-e program, and considers the use of locally generated T-RECs, when combined with the sale of electricity, equivalent to green power. All national and regional criteria apply, but the standard does not cover T-REC-only products, such as those that are not sold with electricity. The group will discuss the adoption of a standard for including metered solar hot water heaters, based on a pilot program in Florida. The Green-e program is administered by the Center for Resource Solutions in San Francisco.