Wind Power

World’s Largest Urban Windfarm Under Study

Three British companies have joined to investigate what could become the world’s largest city windfarm on a major industrial brownfield site on the south bank of the River Tees.

TEESSIDE, Britain, UK, 2001-09-06 [SolarAccess.com] Three British companies have joined to investigate what could become the world’s largest city windfarm on a major industrial brownfield site on the south bank of the River Tees. The TeesWind windfarm could include 30 turbines to generate electricity for 45,000 homes. Key factors to be studied include an analysis of wind patterns, where turbines could be located and an environmental impact analysis. The study is expected to take 18 months to complete, with construction of the project to start in 2003. Substantial grant assistance for the study was secured through the European Commission’s ALTENER program. The project is being managed by Renew North, which played a key role in getting the idea moving and in winning EU financial support. The £120,000 in funding assistance to prepare the TeesWind study is linked with similar projects in Austria and Belgium. Corus, Northern Electric Generation and AMEC Border Wind have joined in the project, and will work with local bodies and energy agencies. “TeesWind represents an innovative approach to dealing with large tracts of former industrial land which would otherwise remain underused for long periods of time,” says local councillor David Walsh. “There are, of course, planning issues to consider, but already the project provides a clear, visually exciting message that Teesside is moving forward in an environmentally responsible way, making use use of clean renewable energy and enjoying the benefits of the associated new jobs.” “The project would promote Teesside to the forefront of the government’s drive to promote renewable energy,” adds Graham Hillier of Corus. “The threat of climate change can be turned into an exciting opportunity to promote emerging clean technologies leading to new local industries and jobs.” Corus would supply the steel and engineering services to build the windfarm, located on company land within the Redcar and Cleveland boundary. AMEC Border Wind would design and establish the facility. Under federal regulations, Northern Electric Generation must obtain 10 percent of its electricity from renewable energy by 2010. Teesside is a major consumer of electricity and would gain from harnessing clean forms of power. The scale of the windfarm could be sufficient to attract a turbine manufacturer to set up a local production plant.