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Britain Backs Renewables in Office Buildings

The British government will spend £18 million to promote the use of renewable energy technology in office buildings.

LONDON, England, UK, 2001-05-01 <SolarAccess.com> The British government will spend £18 million to promote the use of renewable energy technology in office buildings. A partnership called ‘Integration of New & Renewable Energy in Buildings’ has been launched by Trade & Industry secretary Stephen Byers. INREB is designed to reduce the emission of carbon dioxide from buildings and to accelerate the growth of renewable energy products in the United Kingdom. The program is also designed to make Britain into a leading source of renewable energy that could provide an estimated 500,000 additional jobs in the country by 2005, as well as move Britain toward its carbon reductions set under the Kyoto protocol. “We need to encourage small business to exploit the very best in academic knowledge and skills to make sure they have the competitive edge in the UK and in the global market,” says Byers. “This vital investment will have an impact on the future of UK manufacturing and industry and ensure good ideas are properly developed and that researchers understand the potential that their work offers industry.” INREB is one of eight new Faraday Partnerships announced by Byers. The partnerships focus on turning academic research into new products and services in a way that enables business and, in particular, small companies to increase their competitiveness. The partnerships will receive £10 million in funding from Byers’ Department of Trade & Inudstry, £1 million from MAFF and £7 million from the Engineering & Physical Sciences Research Council or the Particle Physics & Astronomy Research Council. Heating systems in British buildings are responsible for 45 percent of the country’s CO2 emissions. A government White Paper last July promised to increase the number of new starts under Faraday Partnerships to 24 by next March. This announcement brings the total to 18.