Bioenergy, Project Development, Wind Power

Canadian Cities are Subsidized to Consider Renewables

A small city in New Brunswick will receive $100,000 to undertake a renewable energy feasibility study in wind power.

OTTAWA, Ontario – A small city in New Brunswick will receive $100,000 to undertake a renewable energy feasibility study in wind power.

Funding to the Ville de Lamèque is one of the first 12 feasibility studies to be supported under the Green Municipal Enabling Fund (GMEF) administered by the Federation of Canadian Municipalities (FCM). The awards from the $25 million program were announced in Ottawa; the FCM also administers $105 million in the Green Municipal Investment Fund (GMIF) with the first projects to announced next month.

The GMEF feasibility studies are designed to stimulate investment in innovative municipal infrastructure projects to improve the environmental performance of cities in air, water or soil quality, climate protection and the use of renewable energy resources.

The Lamèque study will assess the technical, environmental and economic aspects of implementing a wind-power energy project to provide electricity for municipal buildings and to reduce the city’s reliance on electricity from the provincial grid that is generated from fossil fuels. The study will focus on site evaluation and location, project validation, technical feasibility, financial feasibility, environmental Impact Assessment and legal feasibility of the project. It will be undertaken in partnership with community groups, including the University of Moncton.

The City of Sudbury received $75,000 to undertake a feasibility study on a Community Energy Action Plan that will focus on the benefits of energy efficiency in the community and identify viable renewable energy options. The goal is to produce 50 percent of the city’s energy requirements locally, reducing its annual cost of $250 million dollars that go outside the community.

Most of the $500,000 in the first round of applications involved landfill gas utilization, regional composting, community energy systems, and similar plans.

The GMEF and GMIF programs were announced in last year’s federal budget.

“Research, development and creative ideas are an integral part of an innovative economy,” says Energy Minister Ralph Goodale. “We are pleased that the Green Municipal Funds are already at work supporting Canadian municipalities in their efforts to take direct action on climate change. These funds will help our communities to address their environmental concerns.”

The funds complement the government’s $6 billion Infrastructure Canada Program to encourage municipalities to improve the environment.

FCM is the association for municipal governments in Canada.