Grid Scale, Storage

Cellphone Charger Revives Dead Cellphones without Electricity

A U.S. company has introduced a battery charger for cellular telephones that requires no electricity and allows consumers to keep talking while the empty battery charges.

LAS VEGAS, Nevada – Electric Fuel Corporation (EFC) says the pocket-sized Instant Power(TM) Charger weighs less than three ounces and plugs directly into the cellphone, allowing it to be used on a plane, on the street, or anywhere else an electrical outlet is not readily available. A small, disposable PowerCartridge(TM) is the source of the charger’s power, while a SmartCord(TM) electronic adapter connects the universal cartridge to the particular brand or model of cellular phone. Each cartridge is good for up to three charges and hours of talk, with additional cartridges sold separately. The cord stays with the user for the life of the phone. The patented technology activates the fuel inside the cartridge by drawing oxygen from the air through holes in the case, and the charger delivers power within a minute and completes recharging within two hours. After use, the cartridge is placed in an airtight pouch to halt the chemical reaction and preserve power for the next recharge. The Charger is available for Nokia, Motorola, Ericsson, Panasonic and Siemens phones, and will soon be available for Samsung, Audiovox, Mitsubishi, Sagem and Philips brands. EFC also markets Instant Power(TM) Disposable Cellphone Batteries, which are alternative backup power sources that can be used in lieu of recharging and discarded when they run out of power. These batteries snap into place like rechargeables, come fully charged out of the package, and last up to five times longer than standard rechargeables, delivering as much as 16 hours of talk time and up to 25 days of standby, depending on handset model, network, location, climate conditions and usage patterns. The disposable batteries are available for many Nokia, Samsung, Ericsson and Motorola cellphones at major retail outlets in the United States, Britain and Israel. They will soon be distributed throughout Europe. EFC is developing applications for refuelable zinc-air fuel cell technology in consumer electronics, electric vehicles, and defense and safety products. Formed in 1990, the company is based in New York and London, with manufacturing and research facilities in Israel and Alabama.