Offshore, Project Development, Wind Power

European Companies Form Consortium for Wind Energy

Some of the larger companies in renewable energy have formed a consortium to bid on a wind energy project in Holland.

AMSTERDAM, The Netherlands – Royal Dutch/Shell Group subsidiary Shell Renewables, Dutch utility Nuon, ING Bank and Stork NV unit Jacobs Comprino have formed “Noordzeewind” to become more involved in large-scale production of offshore wind power. The group will participate in bidding on a 100 megawatt wind part off the coast at Egmond aan Zee, which the Ministry of Economic Affairs is expected to issue before the end of this year, The so-called “Near Shore” wind park will generate 100 megawatts of electricity per year. A Shell official estimates the initial investment for the project at 400 mlllion, of which the government may contribute 60 million. “Noordzeewind” will combine the expertise of Nuon in the field of energy distribution and the development of wind parks, with Shell’s experience in offshore construction. ING will play an advisory role in financing in the consortium, while Jacobs Comprimo brings in technical expertise. Shell and Nuon are already working together in the British consortium Blyth Offshore Wind, which installed two units of 2 MW each during the summer off the English coast at Blyth. The facility was launched earlier this month by British energy minister Helen Liddell, and the site will generate sufficient green power for 3,000 homes. The Verbruggen committee was set up by the Ministry of Economic Affairs, and gave approval in November to a “Near Shore” wind park within the 12 mile zone off the coast at Egmond aan Zee. The wind park will make a substantial contribution to increasing the proportion of sustainable energy to reduce CO2 emissions. The “Near Shore” project offers an opportunity to increase the knowledge and experience for the construction of future wind parks outside the 12 mile zone, and the Egmond project will lbe linked to an extensive monitoring and evaluation program by government officials.