Scott Sklar's Comments

27 minutes ago

“Mom, My School Bus Is a Peaking Power Plant” and Other Things We Didn’t Say When We Were Kids

Russell is right on target with this article. And two electric bus manufacturers in the US have been pushing this very idea. Electric utilities have thud ands of diesel generators along transmission ones used for line voltage augmentation to prevent is landing. These buses, when not in use, can be parked along lines to do that, and then take their charge before they need to do a school run. The buses can be used during emergencies as mobil on-site power providers for first responders, or for critical functions - cell towers, pipeline pumps, etc. V2G is a viable tactic for resiliency and we need to take this approach more seriously. Thanks for writing this article. - Scott Sklar, Adjunct Professor at The George Washington University

July 12, 2014

Getting Out of the Weeds: How To Control Vegetative Growth Under Solar Arrays

I want to commend the author for not promoting pesticide-intense solutions for controlling vegetation growth under PV arrays. The use of animals, such as emus and goats, as well as certain sheeting and cloths are more optimum and low-energy ways to achieve the same result. We don't want to create other problems such as groundwater contamination, etc. and health impacts of introducing hormone disruptors and immune suppressors into the environment. Great article. Scott Sklar, Adjunct Prof, GWU

July 10, 2014

Lithium or Vanadium: In Energy Storage, It’s No Contest

There is no one battery technology that is perfect. And while the costs and size issues in the article are correct for this moment, they will change dramatically over the next decade -- and there are several other types of commercial batteries available beyond the two mentioned. Liquid electrolytes are great in a controlled area, but not so in remote or mobile applications (or hard-to-reach sites). Scott Sklar, Adjunct Prof, GWU and President, The Stella Group, Ltd.

July 10, 2014

Microgrids Missing from the UN’s Sustainable Energy for All Initiative

There are many omissions in the UN study from many viewpoints. While micro grids are one important omission, I disagree with the author's view that distributed generation is not an equal path -- indeed it is essential, particularly for low-power and critical infrastructure. Dedicated distributed generation (DG), not linked and thus not susceptible to cybersecurity problems, is also an essential tool. There is no one path or approach .. the more parallel approaches and redundancies are the principles that are required.

June 29, 2014

Welcome to the Grid Revolution, Massachusetts-style

What Massachusetts is rightly trying to achieve is maximum choice for consumers, as we have done for phones. No single player, no singe technology, no single energy source can dominate the market. Having a smart grid does not mean they can cut your solar off, but rather route the electrons to where they are most needed and where it is most economic. I have two self-generating buildings in Virginia using battery banks, and such systems are allowed in any case with smarter grids. While these transitions are always rocky, as it certainly was with cellular and the early introduction of WIFI, it's worth the chnage to provide options, lower risks, and ultimately lower costs. Scott Sklar, Adjunct Professor, GWU and President, The Stella Group, Ltd.

June 13, 2014

Listen Up: Home Solar Battery Storage Systems Are Coming

I have PV-battery systems in my both offices and in my home. Most of my commercial projects include battery systems with charging by photovoltaics, small wind, small CHP systems, and even in some cased micro-hydropower systems. Battery systems allow users to load shift, meaning store electricity when it is at the lowest cost or it is free, and use it when electric rates are highest (peak and seasonal power rates, demand charges, and spot or ratchet rates all kick in). Battery systems also allow you to dedicate electric power to critical sub-circuits. That means you can dedicate the battery bank to an circuit breaker sub-panel to those circuits that you want absolute back-up power when the electric grid goes down - refrigeration, WIFI, wall phone and cell phone charging, sump pumps, etc. And batteries ensure very high electric power quality so you no longer have to worry about buying or replacing surge protectors (or ruined solid state equipment) such as office machines, appliances, flat screen TV's , computers, etc. Battery costs are coming way down, and operational life is longer thanks to cellular phones, laptop computers, and hybrid and electric vehicles. And finally, battery integrators are finally beginning to offer more standardize, modular systems with web diagnostics, and without jumbles of spaghetti wires. Once consumers start using battery systems to take portions their electro load off the grid forever, the electric utilities will negotiate more favorably on net metering. Right now they think they have solar consumers over a barrel, but in fact, technology and financing allow us to control our energy future .... the job of electric utilities are to support us, not control us.

May 17, 2014

Why New Nuclear Technology Hurts the Case for Renewables

This is a great article and makes most of the salient points. Nuclear proliferation is also one of the most pressing issues - that the more nuclear material and nuclear waste is out there the greater chance it gets into the wrong hands or into the environment. Nuclear has no place as an option because it is neither sustainable, nor economic, nor safe, nor resilient. Scott Sklar, Adjunct Professor, GWU and Steering Committee Chair, Sustainable Energy Coalition.

May 17, 2014

Why New Nuclear Technology Hurts the Case for Renewables

And for those of you who believe renewables are subsidized, nuclear is the most subsidized of all the energy sources:
The Union of Concerned Scientists released February 2011 report about the subsidies for nuclear power, “Nuclear Power: Still Not Viable Without Subsidies,” found that more than 30 subsidies have supported every stage of the nuclear fuel cycle, from uranium mining to long-term waste storage, which added together, these subsidies cover from 70 – 120% of the investment. often have exceeded the average market price of the power produced. The report also examines the subsidies for new reactors.?
•Executive Summary: http://www.ucsusa.org/assets/documents/nuclear_power/nuclear_subsidies_summary.pdf
•Full Report: http://www.ucsusa.org/assets/documents/nuclear_power/nuclear_subsidies_report.pdf

May 10, 2014

How to Phase Out Incentives and Grow Solar Energy

The article is wrong on many points.

In fact, most of the institutional and commercial solar has been through investment pools, where the investors take the credits via a PPA with the building owner. So this idea that the non-profit sector doesn't enjoy the option actually is inaccurate. Additionally, they are also eligible for CREBs, and State bonds which have also supported solar.

But the real failure of the article is that tax credits should have nothing to do with grid parity. The issue frankly is what attracts "capital". If you want capital to be directed to clean energy, you have to incentivize capital holders to have gains higher than pork-belly futures or fracking, or coal plants - period.

And feed-in tariffs are being cut back all over the world, and have huge capital draws for many years - and while they have been successful in solar ramp ups, they actually have very poor long term long term economic benefits ....closer to what entitlement programs have had to face here in the USA.

Finally, the article is also intertwining energy tax policy. If Congress basically repealed ALL the fossil and nuclear tax and liability subsidies all-together -- then-and-only-then - should Congress think about cutting renewable and energy efficiency subsidies. But the idea that you can continue to subsidize the traditional energy sources forever, but somehow the renewables should compete against these mature technologies, offered by mature companies, in mature markets - is nonsense.

Scott Sklar, President, The Stella Group, Ltd.and Adjunct professor, The George Washington University, E-mail: solarsklar@aol.com Web: www.thestellagroupltd.com

May 09, 2014

Judge Has Harsh Words for Cape Wind Foes

Just another play by the Koch Brothers against renewable energy since they will make billions from the XL pipeline and their other pipeline investments if renewables are deterred. Scott Sklar, President, The Stella Group, Ltd., Washington, DC

April 09, 2014

Concentrating Solar Power Under Fire: Glaring Planning Oversight or Easily Remedied Issue?

While I am sure many sectors of society will have to address certain glare issues from-time-to-time, the problem is way smaller than the 100+ carcinogens from coal, 30+ hormone disrupters from coal, millions of tons of coal ash, particulates, sulfur, nitrous oxides, nuclear waste, water pollution from tracking. So important, but at a much lower level than these other issues we face from traditional energy sources. Scott Sklar. Adjunct Prof GWU and President, The Stella Group, Ltd.

Scott Sklar

Scott Sklar

Scott, founder and president of The Stella Group, Ltd., in Washington, DC, is the Chair of the Steering Committee of the Sustainable Energy Coalition and serves on the Business Council for Sustainable Energy, and The Stella Foundation....

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