Fred Linn's Comments

August 10, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

Brian----that is an elaborate test. But it is set up to test gasoline. Not ethanol. Gasoline has an octane rating of 85-87. Ethanol has an octane rating of ~115. The key to thermal efficiency with internal combustion engines is compression. The higher the compression, the greater the power output and efficiency.

Using gasoline, the upper compression ratio limit is 10.5:1 : using ethanol, the upper compression ratio is 24:1. The upper limit of thermal efficiency Work/BTU = 20% with gasoline. With ethanol the thermal efficiency is close to 50%.

August 13, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

Water affinity is how you remove water from gasoline systems.

DI can give you marginally more compression use-----but when you push it too far there is a sudden power drop off----fuel /air don't adequately mix.

If you don't like ethanol made from corn, make it from something else----we can make it from almost anything.

August 13, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

Unproven tinkering Brian.

Diesel engines routinely run 40% TE, and over. Scania and Mann diesels run 45% and over TE. Indy League Racing Circuit cars run between 50-55% TE(all ILRC car run on 100% ethanol.)

Any diesel engine can run without modification on ethanol with the addition of 5% ignition enhancer. It is designated ED95 (ethanol diesel 95%)

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August 14, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

I am right, you are wrong. The fastest most advanced race cars in the world run on ethanol, Indy League Racing Circuit. Indy cars run on 100% ethanol, and have run on nothing but alcohol base fuels since 1963.

Scania maintains a fleet of over 1,000 buses world wide that run on ethanol (ED95)----and has for over 20 years. They maintain buses in Sweden, UK, Brazil and Hong Kong.

The Model T Ford when introduced in 1908 could be ordered with an adjustable carburetor that could be set to run on either gasoline or ethanol.

August 17, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

I am well aware of the difference between the definition of power and energy.

Why are you so hung up on "energy"----which I interpret you to mean BTUs. So ethanol has a lower BTU content than gasoline, so what? You can still go much farther on ethanol of an equal amount using an engine properly tuned to get the most out of ethanol. That is the point .

Increasing compression ratio also dramatically increases power/weight output ratio. At time to the equation and you get work.

August 22, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WOAyoCo3xXA

The Model T introduced by Henry Ford in 1908 could be ordered with an adjustable carburetor that could be set to run on either gasoline or ethanol.

Do you really believe that Henry Ford could build a better car in 1908 that can be built today?

You are being lied to about our ability to use ethanol.

August 24, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

Brian, you are supposed to put the alcohol in the fuel tank, not drink it.

If you are that worried about range, put a bigger tank on.

August 24, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

What I am telling you is that the reason ethanol is used on Indy League cars----not only power output is increased----TE is increased as well.

In an engine that is properly tuned to make full use of ethanol, the TE increase is so great compared to gasoline, that they can get more MPG using the same amount of fuel than they can using gasoline, even with the BTU difference between gasoline and ethanol.

Thermal efficiency on an Indy engine is over 50% compared to a gasoline engine that is only in the 20 to 25% range.

August 27, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

If you don't like ethanol, use methane. If you don't like ethanol use diesel.

We can make either one from biomass the same as we can ethanol.

Pelletized biomass can also be used directly.

Yes, differing fuels have differing BTU contents----but that does not affect their properties as a fuel. Ethanol is a far superior fuel to petroleum. And in an engine that is tuned to optimum performance for ethanol-----you will get far more BTU value in the fuel back as work at the wheels.

After all, that is what fuel is all about. Getting work back.

September 01, 2014

From Grass in the Field to Fuel in the Hopper: On-Farm Grass Energy is an Opportunity for Farmers

AD can produce methane from any type of biomass at all. Anything that is readily available, cheap or needs disposal will work fine. Anything with cellulose content from old cardboard boxes or newspapers, to lawn clipping and agricultural waste to sewage can work. We've been doing it for thousands of years.

http://www.epa.gov/agstar/anaerobic/

Fred Linn

Fred Linn

I am a cardiopulmonary technologist and registered respiratory therapist. I have been a practitioner and teacher of allied health sciences for 40 years. I have been a teacher in the didactic fields of physics and chemistry and active as...

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