The World's #1 Renewable Energy Network for News, Information, and Companies.
Untitled Document

Solar Goes Mobile, Changes Lives in Remote Regions

As we've seen over the past year, solar energy use worldwide continues to grow rapidly. While this is certainly a positive trend, we face a challenge in today's energy landscape. In some cases, geographic and economic situations make solar power installation extremely difficult. These situations demonstrate a great need for a new way of utilizing solar power.

Consider U.S. military combat zones. These military sites are some of the most remote, dangerous locations in the world, and their heavy dependence on diesel fuel makes conditions all the more perilous. In today’s combat zones, one soldier or civilian dies for every 24 fuel convoys, usually due to improvised explosive devices (IED). Energy use has grown exponentially on modern day military sites, especially in areas where military personnel are sustaining operations in areas far from major support bases. Road networks to remote sites are not well developed, and enemy insurgents can easily target convoys on predictable and constrained supply routes that are difficult or impossible to defend 24 hours a day.

A military site uses an average of seven gallons of fuel for every one gallon delivered. Fuel transport can also be extremely hazardous, requiring military personnel to protect it in transit, which results in casualties. There is clearly a need for alternative energy on these sites, but the logistics of going solar are more than complicated.

Solar power can also make a substantial difference in remote regions without steady access to electricity. In regions throughout the world, small towns and villages suffer from the effects of an unreliable power grid. This lack of power prevents progress and hinders their ability to live in a clean, safe environment. In fact, 1.3 billion people worldwide have no access to power and nearly 1 billion others have limited, inconsistent access. Due to costs and accessibility, powering these regions with solar has been slow to start.

We already know that there is a great need throughout the world – whether for military purposes, poor grid access or humanitarian efforts – for more power. What many people don’t know, however, is that there is a simpler way to deliver solar: mobile solar power. Mobile solar power systems have multiple uses from military applications to rural electrification, humanitarian assistance and emergency disaster response applications.

Thanks to new, developing technology, mobile solar power is now a viable solution. SunDial, founded in 2009 by U.S. military veterans, has created a plug-and-play portable hybrid power system that utilizes ground-breaking technology to provide energy to remote regions of the world quickly and cost-effectively.

These mobile power systems were deployed to Afghanistan with Special Operations Forces in testing from 2010-2012 and proved incredibly successful. On U.S. military sites they have already helped reduce dependence on diesel generators and drastically reduced fuel costs, improving the safety conditions for U.S. military personnel.

While mobile solar power is starting to improve the way energy is used on military sites, it has also begun to change lives in developing nations around the world with inadequate access to power sources, such as Nigeria. Recently a mobile solar power system was installed 100 miles away from grids and roads in Nigeria, and it has given local residents access to clean water for the first time in their lives.

Mobile solar power could also be applied in nations such as India, whose unstable grid made headlines in early August. As solar PV systems begin to take shape in regions all over the world, especially remote ones, mobile solar power should be considered because of its easy installation and transport. While there can be substantial cost upfront, the costs of long term operation are minimal, requiring little to no fuel.

In addition to supplying power to remote regions, mobile solar power can be used in a variety of industries including mining, telecommunications, oil exploration and national government organizations (NGOs) that need power in remote areas.

Mobile solar power has the capacity to revolutionize the energy landscape worldwide. Its life-changing potential for those living or working off-grid will only continue to grow as the technology develops and the possibilities of solar power are realized.

Untitled Document

RELATED ARTICLES

States Already Seek To Delay Clean Power Plan

Andrew Harris, Bloomberg Fifteen states led by coal-rich West Virginia asked a federal court to stall Obama administration rules intended to c...

Stolen Solar Panels and Sabotage A Challenge for Powering India With Renewable Energy

Anindya Upadhyay, Bloomberg Disappointment spread across Tarun Singh’s face when he saw that parts of his solar power microgrid in eastern India’...

Suntech Parent Company Buys Majority Share of US-based Suniva

Ehren Goossens Shunfeng International Clean Energy Ltd., the Hong Kong-based solar company controlled by billionaire Zheng Jianming,...

Sunrise in Pakistan as the Country Delves into Solar PV

Robert Harker Pakistan has joined the list of countries that are exploring solar power as a means to bridge critical energy generat...

PRESS RELEASES

20 days to GRC Annual Meeting & GEA Geothermal Energy Expo

The Geothermal Resources Council (GRC) has announced that it is only 20 days to go to t...

AWS Truepower Announces Major Expansion of its Due Diligence Team in Response to Growing Market Demand

AWS Truepower, an international leader in wind and solar energy consulting and engineer...

Array Technologies’ DuraTrack HZ v3 Continues to (R)evolutionize at SPI

Array Technologies, Inc. (ATI) prepares to showcase its recently launched tracking syst...

Appalachian's Energy Center assists counties with landfill gas to energy projects

The Appalachian Energy Center at Appalachian State University recently completed a proj...

FEATURED BLOGS

How To Get People To Do Stuff

It’s no secret that psychology and sales go hand in hand. If you understand the principles of human psychology ...

Get In The Groove

When we talk about strategies for boosting productivity, we often overlook the fact certain projects lend themselves ...

Transitioning to Net-Zero Living

Judith and Jeffrey adore living in Belfast, Maine – a quaint harbor town of Belfast, Maine. They previously res...

The True Cost of Electric Vehicles in Australia

In order to avoid increased congestion, further greenhouse warming and lessen Australia’s reliance on imported ...

FINANCIAL NEWS

Daniel Rice is the co-founder and president of SunDial. Daniel is a former army officer, West Point graduate and Kellogg MBA who received the Purple Heart Medal after being hit himself by an IED in Iraq in 2005 after volunteering to return to acti...

CURRENT MAGAZINE ISSUE

Volume 18, Issue 4
1507REW_C11

STAY CONNECTED

To register for our free
e-Newsletters, subscribe today:

SOCIAL ACTIVITY

Tweet the Editors! @jennrunyon

FEATURED PARTNERS



EVENTS

Intersolar North America 2016

Exhibition: July 12 - 14, 2016; Conference: July 11 - 13, 2016 Intersola...

Intersolar South America 2015

Exhibition and Conference: September 1-3, 2015 Intersolar South America ...

Intersolar Europe 2016

Exhibition: June 22-24, 2016; Conference: June 21-22, 2016 Intersolar Eu...

COMPANY BLOGS

How To Recruit An Internal Ally

When you’re collecting information for a proposal, the person with...

The Proof Is Not Always In The Pudding

One of the best ways to turn a skeptical prospect into a buyer is to giv...

Pushing Beyond The Cushion

Efficiency projects are all too often viewed as “optional” o...

NEWSLETTERS

Renewable Energy: Subscribe Now

Solar Energy: Subscribe Now

Wind Energy: Subscribe Now

Geothermal Energy: Subscribe Now

Bioenergy: Subscribe Now  

 

FEATURED PARTNERS