The World's #1 Renewable Energy Network for News, Information, and Companies.

CASE Companies Rail Against China "Trade War"

Members of the Coalition for Affordable Solar Energy (CASE) railed against the impending "trade war," arguing that the steep price drop in imported Chinese photovoltaic modules was good for "98 percent" of U.S. solar industry jobs. "We are growing U.S. solar jobs and this trade case will undermine all the advances we have made in the U.S. solar industry," said one CASE member.

Holding a press conference Thursday morning in Washington after testimony was heard Wednesday by the U.S. International Trade Commission (ITC) about the alleged dumping of Chinese modules in the United States, CASE member Kevin Lapidus, senior vice president for legal and government affairs at SunEdison, said, "This case is not good for U.S. policy. SolarWorld, a German company, is using the U.S. legal system to compensate for its own business mistakes. It has triggered a global trade war that has mushroomed beyond the United States." 

Hoyle Kim, general counsel for GT Advanced Technologies, went further in his rejection of the dumping charges as bad for the U.S. solar industry: "I strongly feel that this anti-dumping case is a horrible incidence in the legal process intended to protect American competitiveness. Trade barriers will not improve the solar industry and the tariff exercise is counter-productive. The timing of the situation is a pity because of the tremendous technological progress (that has been seen in this country) in increased efficiency and reduced costs."

Francine Sullivan, the vice president and legal counsel or REC Silicon, observed, "If the Commerce Department does uphold tariffs, it will increase the cost of solar in the United States. Protectionism is bad for the U.S. solar industry." She added that, "If solar growth is left on its own, the Chinese module capacity -- and more -- will be required; solar is a global market."

George Hershman, vice president of San Francisco-based Swinerton Renewable Energy, a utility-oriented developer, echoed the group sentiment, saying, "There are a number of solar projects on hold now, as this issue gets resolved. Uncertainty and time drive up costs, so we are fighting a race against lower cost solar."

Lapidus noted that while the European solar industry -- which also is considering Chinese dumping charges -- may be slowing, growth is rampant in several other parts of the world. "Many new countries are coming on line as solar markets, like Japan and Saudi Arabia, and regions like Southeast Asia and South America also are very good markets for solar."

The ITC will determine in early November whether U.S. manufacturers have been harmed by Chinese imports. If the ITC does determine injury has occurred, preliminary tariffs imposed by the U.S. Commerce Department in May, ranging from 30 percent to 250 percent, would continue. Commerce is expected to issue a final ruling by October 10. The dumping complaint was initiated by SolarWorld, and has been joined by several other U.S. manufacturers.

In retaliation, China in May filed a complaint against U.S. subsidies that affected over $7 billion worth of Chinese products

RELATED ARTICLES

A Closer Look at Fossil and Renewable Energy Subsidies

Susan Kraemer, Contrubutor A new study by the International Monetary Fund puts the total cost of fossil fuel subsidies at approximately $10 million a minute globally, when health costs and environmental degradation are included, never mind the effect...

How to Win Planning Permission for Renewable Energy Projects (and Influence People)

Tildy Bayar, Contributor At Tuesday afternoon’s POWER-GEN Europe and Renewable Energy World Europe conference session in Amsterdam, Paul Davison of PR firm Proteus discussed how to best communicate with the public regarding renewable ener...
Egypt flag

Egypt's Renewable Energy Drive Gains Steam

Andrew Burger, Correspondent There's a lot of action in Egypt's rapidly developing solar and renewable energy market space. Nearly 5 GW worth of solar power development agreements have been signed so far this year, while Egypt 's New and Renewable Ener...

Elon Musk Says Utilities Shouldn’t Fear His Battery Systems

Mark Chediak and Dana Hull, Bloomberg

Elon Musk, chief executive officer of Tesla Motors Inc., told electric utility owners they shouldn’t fear that his battery systems will put them out of business -- instead, they should buy them.

 

Charles W. Thurston is a journalist who specializes in renewable energy, from finance to technological processes. He has been active in the industry for over 25 years, living and working in locations ranging from Brazil to Papua New Guinea.

CURRENT MAGAZINE ISSUE

Volume 18, Issue 3
1505REW_C11

STAY CONNECTED

To register for our free
e-Newsletters, subscribe today:

SOCIAL ACTIVITY

Tweet the Editors! @megcichon @jennrunyon

FEATURED PARTNERS



EVENTS

2015 Solar Power International

Stop by and visit Canadian Solar at the 2015 SPI show!

2015 Intersolar-North America

Intersolar is North America's premier solar show, and it is taking place...

PV-201: Introduction to PV Design & Installation

PV 201 Introduction to PV Design & Installation is simply the best i...

COMPANY BLOGS

DIY: Don’t Install Yourself

You finally made the choice to go solar. Seems like it might be pretty e...

Capturing Your Prospects' Attention In Three Sentences

You have about 15 seconds to capture your prospects’ attention, wh...

Five Reasons to Go Solar Now

Solar’s popularity has skyrocketed recently, thanks to a price dro...

NEWSLETTERS

Renewable Energy: Subscribe Now

Solar Energy: Subscribe Now

Wind Energy: Subscribe Now

Geothermal Energy: Subscribe Now

Bioenergy: Subscribe Now  

 

FEATURED PARTNERS